Complex solutions for complex problems? Exploring the effects of task complexity on student use of design for additive manufacturing and creativity

Rohan Prabhu, Scarlett R. Miller, Timothy W. Simpson, Nicholas A. Meisel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The integration of additive manufacturing (AM) processes in many industries has led to the need for AM education and training, particularly on design for AM (DfAM). To meet this growing need, several academic institutions have implemented educational interventions, especially project- and problem-based, for AM education; however, limited research has explored how the choice of the problem statement influences the design outcomes of a task-based AM/DfAM intervention. This research explores this gap in the literature through an experimental study with 222 undergraduate engineering students. Specifically, the study compared the effects of restrictive and dual (restrictive and opportunistic) DfAM education, when introduced through either a simple or complex design task. The effects of the intervention were measured through (1) changes in student DfAM self-efficacy, (2) student self-reported emphasis on DfAM, and (3) the creativity of student AM designs. The results show that the complexity of the design task has a significant effect on the participants’ self-efficacy with, and self-reported emphasis on, certain DfAM concepts. The results also show that the complex design task results in participants generating ideas with greater median uniqueness compared to the simple design task. These findings highlight the importance of the chosen problem statement on the outcomes of a DfAM educational intervention, and future work is also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication21st International Conference on Advanced Vehicle Technologies; 16th International Conference on Design Education
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
ISBN (Electronic)9780791859216
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
EventASME 2019 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC-CIE 2019 - Anaheim, United States
Duration: Aug 18 2019Aug 21 2019

Publication series

NameProceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference
Volume3

Conference

ConferenceASME 2019 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC-CIE 2019
CountryUnited States
CityAnaheim
Period8/18/198/21/19

Fingerprint

3D printers
Manufacturing
Students
Self-efficacy
Education
Creativity
Design
Design for Manufacturing

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Modeling and Simulation

Cite this

Prabhu, R., Miller, S. R., Simpson, T. W., & Meisel, N. A. (2019). Complex solutions for complex problems? Exploring the effects of task complexity on student use of design for additive manufacturing and creativity. In 21st International Conference on Advanced Vehicle Technologies; 16th International Conference on Design Education (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference; Vol. 3). American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2019-97474
Prabhu, Rohan ; Miller, Scarlett R. ; Simpson, Timothy W. ; Meisel, Nicholas A. / Complex solutions for complex problems? Exploring the effects of task complexity on student use of design for additive manufacturing and creativity. 21st International Conference on Advanced Vehicle Technologies; 16th International Conference on Design Education. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2019. (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference).
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Prabhu, R, Miller, SR, Simpson, TW & Meisel, NA 2019, Complex solutions for complex problems? Exploring the effects of task complexity on student use of design for additive manufacturing and creativity. in 21st International Conference on Advanced Vehicle Technologies; 16th International Conference on Design Education. Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference, vol. 3, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), ASME 2019 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC-CIE 2019, Anaheim, United States, 8/18/19. https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2019-97474

Complex solutions for complex problems? Exploring the effects of task complexity on student use of design for additive manufacturing and creativity. / Prabhu, Rohan; Miller, Scarlett R.; Simpson, Timothy W.; Meisel, Nicholas A.

21st International Conference on Advanced Vehicle Technologies; 16th International Conference on Design Education. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2019. (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference; Vol. 3).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Prabhu R, Miller SR, Simpson TW, Meisel NA. Complex solutions for complex problems? Exploring the effects of task complexity on student use of design for additive manufacturing and creativity. In 21st International Conference on Advanced Vehicle Technologies; 16th International Conference on Design Education. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). 2019. (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2019-97474