Compliance of middle school-aged babysitters in central Pennsylvania with national recommendations for emergency preparedness and safety practices

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Abstract

Objective. To determine the compliance of middle school-aged babysitters with national recommendations for emergency preparedness and safety practices. Patients and methods. A prospective, self-administered questionnaire-based study was conducted at 3 middle schools in central Pennsylvania. Results. A total of 1364 questionnaires were available for analysis. Responding babysitters (n = 890) reported previous training that included babysitter (21%), first aid (64%), and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (59%) training. Reported unsafe babysitter practices were leaving a child unattended (36%) and opening the door to a stranger (24%). The most common emergency experience encountered by responding babysitters included cut or scrape (83%), burns (28%), and choking (14%). Ten percent of responding babysitters have activated the 911 system. Conclusions. Middle school-aged babysitters will likely encounter common household emergencies and therefore benefit from first aid training; however, very little difference in safety knowledge was found between trained and untrained babysitters, suggesting modifications in babysitter training programs may be required.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)574-583
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Pediatrics
Volume51
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2012

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Civil Defense
Compliance
First Aid
Safety
Emergencies
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Airway Obstruction
Burns
Education
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

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title = "Compliance of middle school-aged babysitters in central Pennsylvania with national recommendations for emergency preparedness and safety practices",
abstract = "Objective. To determine the compliance of middle school-aged babysitters with national recommendations for emergency preparedness and safety practices. Patients and methods. A prospective, self-administered questionnaire-based study was conducted at 3 middle schools in central Pennsylvania. Results. A total of 1364 questionnaires were available for analysis. Responding babysitters (n = 890) reported previous training that included babysitter (21{\%}), first aid (64{\%}), and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (59{\%}) training. Reported unsafe babysitter practices were leaving a child unattended (36{\%}) and opening the door to a stranger (24{\%}). The most common emergency experience encountered by responding babysitters included cut or scrape (83{\%}), burns (28{\%}), and choking (14{\%}). Ten percent of responding babysitters have activated the 911 system. Conclusions. Middle school-aged babysitters will likely encounter common household emergencies and therefore benefit from first aid training; however, very little difference in safety knowledge was found between trained and untrained babysitters, suggesting modifications in babysitter training programs may be required.",
author = "Nicole Hackman and Katie Cass and Robert Olympia",
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issn = "0009-9228",
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N2 - Objective. To determine the compliance of middle school-aged babysitters with national recommendations for emergency preparedness and safety practices. Patients and methods. A prospective, self-administered questionnaire-based study was conducted at 3 middle schools in central Pennsylvania. Results. A total of 1364 questionnaires were available for analysis. Responding babysitters (n = 890) reported previous training that included babysitter (21%), first aid (64%), and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (59%) training. Reported unsafe babysitter practices were leaving a child unattended (36%) and opening the door to a stranger (24%). The most common emergency experience encountered by responding babysitters included cut or scrape (83%), burns (28%), and choking (14%). Ten percent of responding babysitters have activated the 911 system. Conclusions. Middle school-aged babysitters will likely encounter common household emergencies and therefore benefit from first aid training; however, very little difference in safety knowledge was found between trained and untrained babysitters, suggesting modifications in babysitter training programs may be required.

AB - Objective. To determine the compliance of middle school-aged babysitters with national recommendations for emergency preparedness and safety practices. Patients and methods. A prospective, self-administered questionnaire-based study was conducted at 3 middle schools in central Pennsylvania. Results. A total of 1364 questionnaires were available for analysis. Responding babysitters (n = 890) reported previous training that included babysitter (21%), first aid (64%), and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (59%) training. Reported unsafe babysitter practices were leaving a child unattended (36%) and opening the door to a stranger (24%). The most common emergency experience encountered by responding babysitters included cut or scrape (83%), burns (28%), and choking (14%). Ten percent of responding babysitters have activated the 911 system. Conclusions. Middle school-aged babysitters will likely encounter common household emergencies and therefore benefit from first aid training; however, very little difference in safety knowledge was found between trained and untrained babysitters, suggesting modifications in babysitter training programs may be required.

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