Components of family history associated with women's disease perceptions for cancer: A report from the Family Healthware™ Impact Trial

Wendy S. Rubinstein, Suzanne M. O'Neill, Nan Rothrock, Erin J. Starzyk, Jennifer L. Beaumont, Louise S. Acheson, Catharine Wang, Robert Gramling, James M. Galliher, MacK T. Ruffin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Purpose: To determine the specific components of family history and personal characteristics related to disease perceptions about breast, colon, and ovarian cancers. Methods: Baseline, cross-sectional data on 2,505 healthy women aged 35-65 years enrolled from 41 primary care practices in the cluster-randomized Family Healthware™ Impact Trial, assessed for detailed family history and perceived risk, perceived severity, worry, and perceived control over getting six common diseases including breast, colon, and ovarian cancers. Results: Participants provided family history information on 41,841 total relatives. We found evidence of underreporting of paternal family history and lower perceived breast cancer risk with cancer in the paternal versus maternal lineage. We observed cancer-specific perceived risks and worry for individual family history elements and also found novel "spillover" effects where a family history of one cancer was associated with altered disease perceptions of another. Having a mother with early-onset breast or ovarian cancer was strongly associated with perceived risk of breast cancer. Age, parenthood, and affected lineage were associated with disease perceptions and ran counter to empiric risks. Conclusions: Understanding patients'formulation of risk for multiple diseases is important for public health initiatives that seek to inform risk appraisal, influence disease perceptions, or match preventive interventions to existing risk perceptions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)52-62
Number of pages11
JournalGenetics in Medicine
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

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Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Ovarian Neoplasms
Colonic Neoplasms
Mothers
Primary Health Care
Public Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Rubinstein, Wendy S. ; O'Neill, Suzanne M. ; Rothrock, Nan ; Starzyk, Erin J. ; Beaumont, Jennifer L. ; Acheson, Louise S. ; Wang, Catharine ; Gramling, Robert ; Galliher, James M. ; Ruffin, MacK T. / Components of family history associated with women's disease perceptions for cancer : A report from the Family Healthware™ Impact Trial. In: Genetics in Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 13, No. 1. pp. 52-62.
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Rubinstein, WS, O'Neill, SM, Rothrock, N, Starzyk, EJ, Beaumont, JL, Acheson, LS, Wang, C, Gramling, R, Galliher, JM & Ruffin, MT 2011, 'Components of family history associated with women's disease perceptions for cancer: A report from the Family Healthware™ Impact Trial', Genetics in Medicine, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 52-62. https://doi.org/10.1097/GIM.0b013e3181fbe485

Components of family history associated with women's disease perceptions for cancer : A report from the Family Healthware™ Impact Trial. / Rubinstein, Wendy S.; O'Neill, Suzanne M.; Rothrock, Nan; Starzyk, Erin J.; Beaumont, Jennifer L.; Acheson, Louise S.; Wang, Catharine; Gramling, Robert; Galliher, James M.; Ruffin, MacK T.

In: Genetics in Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 1, 01.01.2011, p. 52-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T2 - A report from the Family Healthware™ Impact Trial

AU - Rubinstein, Wendy S.

AU - O'Neill, Suzanne M.

AU - Rothrock, Nan

AU - Starzyk, Erin J.

AU - Beaumont, Jennifer L.

AU - Acheson, Louise S.

AU - Wang, Catharine

AU - Gramling, Robert

AU - Galliher, James M.

AU - Ruffin, MacK T.

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N2 - Purpose: To determine the specific components of family history and personal characteristics related to disease perceptions about breast, colon, and ovarian cancers. Methods: Baseline, cross-sectional data on 2,505 healthy women aged 35-65 years enrolled from 41 primary care practices in the cluster-randomized Family Healthware™ Impact Trial, assessed for detailed family history and perceived risk, perceived severity, worry, and perceived control over getting six common diseases including breast, colon, and ovarian cancers. Results: Participants provided family history information on 41,841 total relatives. We found evidence of underreporting of paternal family history and lower perceived breast cancer risk with cancer in the paternal versus maternal lineage. We observed cancer-specific perceived risks and worry for individual family history elements and also found novel "spillover" effects where a family history of one cancer was associated with altered disease perceptions of another. Having a mother with early-onset breast or ovarian cancer was strongly associated with perceived risk of breast cancer. Age, parenthood, and affected lineage were associated with disease perceptions and ran counter to empiric risks. Conclusions: Understanding patients'formulation of risk for multiple diseases is important for public health initiatives that seek to inform risk appraisal, influence disease perceptions, or match preventive interventions to existing risk perceptions.

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