Composition and improvisation in instrumental methods courses: Instrumental music teacher educators' perspectives

David A. Stringham, Linda Carol Porter Thornton, Daniel J. Shevock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Many musical traditions value creative music making in the form of composition and improvisation. However, research indicates American public school teachers consider improvisation and composition among the least important and most difficult skills to teach. Because instrumental methods courses serve as one source for preparing future instrumental teachers, this mixed meth-ods study elicited experiences, values, and decisions from a national population (n = 8) served as the data sources. Results indicated general support for improvisation and composition in teacher preparation, but low levels of prioritization in instrumental methods courses. Instructors' comfort with those skills, curricular space, and preparation for existing jobs were among reported barriers to prioritizing composition and improvisation in coursework. Recommendations include greater intentionality in planning for composition and improvisation by teacher educators, professional development opportunities for in-service teachers, and encouraging future music teachers to seek musical experiences beyond typical requirements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7-25
Number of pages19
JournalBulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education
Issue number205
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

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spontaneity
music teacher
educator
teacher
Values
instructor
experience
music
Music Teacher
Educators
Improvisation
Instrumental music
planning
school

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Music

Cite this

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