Computational micromechanics of dynamic compressive loading of a brittle polycrystalline material using a distribution of grain boundary properties

R. H. Kraft, J. F. Molinari, K. T. Ramesh, D. H. Warner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A two-dimensional finite element model is used to investigate compressive loading of a brittle ceramic. Intergranular cracking in the microstructure is captured explicitly by using a distribution of cohesive interfaces. The addition of confining stress increases the maximum strength and if high enough, can allow the effective material response to reach large strains before failure. Increasing the friction at the grain boundaries also increases the maximum strength until saturation of the strength is approached. Above a transitional strain rate, increasing the rate-of-deformation also increases the strength and as the strain rate increases, fragment sizes of the damaged specimen decrease. The effects of flaws within the specimen were investigated using a random distribution at various initial flaw densities. The model is able to capture an effective modulus change and degradation of strength as the initial flaw density increases. Effects of confinement, friction, and spatial distribution of flaws seem to depend on the crack coalescence and dilatation of the specimen, while strain-rate effects are result of inertial resistance to motion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2618-2641
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids
Volume56
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2008

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micromechanics
brittle materials
Polycrystalline materials
Micromechanics
Grain boundaries
grain boundaries
Strain rate
Defects
strain rate
defects
Friction
friction
Coalescence
Spatial distribution
statistical distributions
confining
coalescing
Cracks
spatial distribution
Degradation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

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abstract = "A two-dimensional finite element model is used to investigate compressive loading of a brittle ceramic. Intergranular cracking in the microstructure is captured explicitly by using a distribution of cohesive interfaces. The addition of confining stress increases the maximum strength and if high enough, can allow the effective material response to reach large strains before failure. Increasing the friction at the grain boundaries also increases the maximum strength until saturation of the strength is approached. Above a transitional strain rate, increasing the rate-of-deformation also increases the strength and as the strain rate increases, fragment sizes of the damaged specimen decrease. The effects of flaws within the specimen were investigated using a random distribution at various initial flaw densities. The model is able to capture an effective modulus change and degradation of strength as the initial flaw density increases. Effects of confinement, friction, and spatial distribution of flaws seem to depend on the crack coalescence and dilatation of the specimen, while strain-rate effects are result of inertial resistance to motion.",
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Computational micromechanics of dynamic compressive loading of a brittle polycrystalline material using a distribution of grain boundary properties. / Kraft, R. H.; Molinari, J. F.; Ramesh, K. T.; Warner, D. H.

In: Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids, Vol. 56, No. 8, 01.08.2008, p. 2618-2641.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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