Computerized medical records in Family Medicine journals, 1981-1990: Diffusion of an innovation

L. Fredman, Alan Adelman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined whether references to computerized medical records in family medicine journals had increased over the past decade as an example of diffusion of innovations. The abstract and methods sections of articles in Family Medicine, the Journal of Family Practice, and the Journal of the American Board of Family Practice were reviewed from 1981 to 1990 for explicit references to computerized medical records. The proportion of articles citing computerized medical records did not significantly increase overall or in any one journal during this time. Articles referenced computerized medical records with regard to sample selection for research studies (54%), description of computerized medical record systems (26%), and generation of health maintenance reminders (4%). These results are discussed in the context of family medicine literature and in terms of factors that typically impede the diffusion of innovations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)232-234
Number of pages3
JournalFamily medicine
Volume24
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

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Diffusion of Innovation
Computerized Medical Records Systems
Medicine
Family Practice
Medicine in Literature
Health
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Family Practice

Cite this

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Computerized medical records in Family Medicine journals, 1981-1990 : Diffusion of an innovation. / Fredman, L.; Adelman, Alan.

In: Family medicine, Vol. 24, No. 3, 01.01.1992, p. 232-234.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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