Concise Review: Bioprinting of Stem Cells for Transplantable Tissue Fabrication

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bioprinting is a quickly progressing technology, which holds the potential to generate replacement tissues and organs. Stem cells offer several advantages over differentiated cells for use as starting materials, including the potential for autologous tissue and differentiation into multiple cell lines. The three most commonly used stem cells are embryonic, induced pluripotent, and adult stem cells. Cells are combined with various natural and synthetic materials to form bioinks, which are used to fabricate scaffold-based or scaffold-free constructs. Computer aided design technology is combined with various bioprinting modalities including droplet-, extrusion-, or laser-based bioprinting to create tissue constructs. Each bioink and modality has its own advantages and disadvantages. Various materials and techniques are combined to maximize the benefits. Researchers have been successful in bioprinting cartilage, bone, cardiac, nervous, liver, and vascular tissues. However, a major limitation to clinical translation is building large-scale vascularized constructs. Many challenges must be overcome before this technology is used routinely in a clinical setting. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1940–1948.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1940-1948
Number of pages9
JournalStem Cells Translational Medicine
Volume6
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

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Bioprinting
Stem Cells
Technology
Computer-Aided Design
Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
Adult Stem Cells
Translational Medical Research
Embryonic Stem Cells
Cartilage
Blood Vessels
Lasers
Research Personnel
Bone and Bones
Cell Line
Liver

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

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abstract = "Bioprinting is a quickly progressing technology, which holds the potential to generate replacement tissues and organs. Stem cells offer several advantages over differentiated cells for use as starting materials, including the potential for autologous tissue and differentiation into multiple cell lines. The three most commonly used stem cells are embryonic, induced pluripotent, and adult stem cells. Cells are combined with various natural and synthetic materials to form bioinks, which are used to fabricate scaffold-based or scaffold-free constructs. Computer aided design technology is combined with various bioprinting modalities including droplet-, extrusion-, or laser-based bioprinting to create tissue constructs. Each bioink and modality has its own advantages and disadvantages. Various materials and techniques are combined to maximize the benefits. Researchers have been successful in bioprinting cartilage, bone, cardiac, nervous, liver, and vascular tissues. However, a major limitation to clinical translation is building large-scale vascularized constructs. Many challenges must be overcome before this technology is used routinely in a clinical setting. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1940–1948.",
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Concise Review : Bioprinting of Stem Cells for Transplantable Tissue Fabrication. / Leberfinger, Ashley N.; Ravnic, Dino J.; Dhawan, Aman; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T.

In: Stem Cells Translational Medicine, Vol. 6, No. 10, 01.10.2017, p. 1940-1948.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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