Conditioned taste aversion and drugs of abuse: A reinterpretation

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

198 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A new hypothesis (and supporting data) provides a solution to the 25- year-old paradox whereby positively reinforcing drugs of abuse also support a conditioned taste aversion (CTA). The results show that unlike LiCl-induced CTAs, morphine- and cocaine-induced suppression of conditioned stimulus (CS) intake depends on the rewarding properties of the gustatory CS. This finding argues the long-standing CTA interpretation in favor of a new reward comparison account. That is, rats decrease intake of a gustatory CS following taste-drug pairings because the value of the CS is outweighed by that of a highly reinforcing psychoactive drug. Suppression of CS intake, then, is a consequence of the well-documented positive reinforcing, rather than the hypothetical aversive, properties of drugs of abuse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-136
Number of pages8
JournalBehavioral Neuroscience
Volume111
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 1997

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Street Drugs
Psychotropic Drugs
Reward
Cocaine
Morphine
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

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Conditioned taste aversion and drugs of abuse : A reinterpretation. / Grigson-Kennedy, Patricia "Sue".

In: Behavioral Neuroscience, Vol. 111, No. 1, 01.02.1997, p. 129-136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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