Conflict frequency with mothers and fathers from middle childhood to late adolescence: Within- and between-families comparisons.

Lilly Shanahan, Susan M. McHale, Wayne Osgood, Ann C. Crouter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

86 Scopus citations

Abstract

The authors examined siblings' dyadic and differential conflict frequency with mothers and fathers from 7 to 19 years of age. Participants were first- and second-borns from 201 families who reported their conflict with each parent in 4 home interviews spaced over 5 years. Multilevel models examining trajectories of conflict frequency across age and year of study revealed that (a) consistent with a spillover hypothesis, elevation in parent- offspring conflict frequency was timed to firstborns' transition to adolescence for both siblings; and (b) consistent with a learning-from-experience hypothesis, there was no increase in conflict frequency at second-borns' transition to adolescence. These findings highlight the importance of studying the development of parent- offspring conflict within the larger family system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)539-550
Number of pages12
JournalDevelopmental psychology
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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