Congenital brain and spinal cord malformations and their associated cutaneous markers

Mark Dias, Michael Partington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The brain, spinal cord, and skin are all derived from the embryonic ectoderm this common derivation leads to a high association between central nervous system dysraphic malformations and abnormalities of the overlying skin. A myelomeningocele is an obvious open malformation, the identification of which is not usually difficult. However, the relationship between congenital spinal cord malformations and other cutaneous malformations, such as dimples, vascular anomalies (including infantile hemangiomata and other vascular malformations), congenital pigmented nevi or other hamartomata, or midline hairy patches may be less obvious but no less important. Pediatricians should be aware of these associations, recognize the cutaneous markers associated with congenital central nervous system malformations, and refer children with such markers to the appropriate specialist in a timely fashion for further evaluation and treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e1105-e1119
JournalPediatrics
Volume136
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

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Nervous System Malformations
Spinal Cord
Skin
Brain
Central Nervous System
Pigmented Nevus
Meningomyelocele
Ectoderm
Vascular Malformations
Hamartoma
Hemangioma
Blood Vessels
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Dias, Mark ; Partington, Michael. / Congenital brain and spinal cord malformations and their associated cutaneous markers. In: Pediatrics. 2015 ; Vol. 136, No. 4. pp. e1105-e1119.
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Congenital brain and spinal cord malformations and their associated cutaneous markers. / Dias, Mark; Partington, Michael.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 136, No. 4, 01.10.2015, p. e1105-e1119.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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