Congruence work in stigmatized occupations: A managerial lens on employee fit with dirty work

Blake E. Ashforth, Glen Kreiner, Mark A. Clark, Mel Fugate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although research has established that it is often difficult for individuals engaged in dirty work to adjust to stigma and the attributes giving rise to stigma, little theory or empirical work addresses how managers may help workers adjust to dirty work. Interviews with managers across 18 dirty work occupations—physically tainted (e.g., animal control), socially tainted (e.g., corrections), and morally tainted (e.g., exotic entertainment)—indicate that managers engage in “congruence work”: behaviors, sensemaking, and sensegiving that they perceive as helping individuals adjust and develop a stronger sense of person–environment fit. Specifically, congruence work focuses on 3 phases of managerial practices that correspond to individuals' growing experience in the occupation. First, recruitment/selection involves overcoming individuals' aversion to dirty work by selecting individuals with an affinity for the work and providing a realistic stigma preview. Second, socialization involves helping newcomers adjust to distasteful tasks and to stigma by using targeted divestiture, developing perspective taking, helping newcomers manage external relationships, and utilizing desensitization or immersion. Third, ongoing management roles involve cementing individuals' fit by fostering social validation, protecting workers from dirty work hazards, and negotiating the frontstage/backstage boundary. The practices identified as congruence work highlight the important role that managers can play in facilitating adjustment for both “dirty workers” and presumably their less stigmatized counterparts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1260-1279
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Organizational Behavior
Volume38
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

Fingerprint

Occupations
Lenses
occupation
employee
manager
worker
Foster Home Care
Socialization
psychotherapy
Congruence
Stigma
Managers
Employees
entertainment
Negotiating
Immersion
socialization
Workers
animal
Interviews

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Psychology(all)
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Cite this

Ashforth, Blake E. ; Kreiner, Glen ; Clark, Mark A. ; Fugate, Mel. / Congruence work in stigmatized occupations : A managerial lens on employee fit with dirty work. In: Journal of Organizational Behavior. 2017 ; Vol. 38, No. 8. pp. 1260-1279.
@article{45a36a5f7a044957b310d77e86031536,
title = "Congruence work in stigmatized occupations: A managerial lens on employee fit with dirty work",
abstract = "Although research has established that it is often difficult for individuals engaged in dirty work to adjust to stigma and the attributes giving rise to stigma, little theory or empirical work addresses how managers may help workers adjust to dirty work. Interviews with managers across 18 dirty work occupations—physically tainted (e.g., animal control), socially tainted (e.g., corrections), and morally tainted (e.g., exotic entertainment)—indicate that managers engage in “congruence work”: behaviors, sensemaking, and sensegiving that they perceive as helping individuals adjust and develop a stronger sense of person–environment fit. Specifically, congruence work focuses on 3 phases of managerial practices that correspond to individuals' growing experience in the occupation. First, recruitment/selection involves overcoming individuals' aversion to dirty work by selecting individuals with an affinity for the work and providing a realistic stigma preview. Second, socialization involves helping newcomers adjust to distasteful tasks and to stigma by using targeted divestiture, developing perspective taking, helping newcomers manage external relationships, and utilizing desensitization or immersion. Third, ongoing management roles involve cementing individuals' fit by fostering social validation, protecting workers from dirty work hazards, and negotiating the frontstage/backstage boundary. The practices identified as congruence work highlight the important role that managers can play in facilitating adjustment for both “dirty workers” and presumably their less stigmatized counterparts.",
author = "Ashforth, {Blake E.} and Glen Kreiner and Clark, {Mark A.} and Mel Fugate",
year = "2017",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/job.2201",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "38",
pages = "1260--1279",
journal = "Journal of Organizational Behavior",
issn = "0894-3796",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "8",

}

Congruence work in stigmatized occupations : A managerial lens on employee fit with dirty work. / Ashforth, Blake E.; Kreiner, Glen; Clark, Mark A.; Fugate, Mel.

In: Journal of Organizational Behavior, Vol. 38, No. 8, 01.10.2017, p. 1260-1279.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Congruence work in stigmatized occupations

T2 - A managerial lens on employee fit with dirty work

AU - Ashforth, Blake E.

AU - Kreiner, Glen

AU - Clark, Mark A.

AU - Fugate, Mel

PY - 2017/10/1

Y1 - 2017/10/1

N2 - Although research has established that it is often difficult for individuals engaged in dirty work to adjust to stigma and the attributes giving rise to stigma, little theory or empirical work addresses how managers may help workers adjust to dirty work. Interviews with managers across 18 dirty work occupations—physically tainted (e.g., animal control), socially tainted (e.g., corrections), and morally tainted (e.g., exotic entertainment)—indicate that managers engage in “congruence work”: behaviors, sensemaking, and sensegiving that they perceive as helping individuals adjust and develop a stronger sense of person–environment fit. Specifically, congruence work focuses on 3 phases of managerial practices that correspond to individuals' growing experience in the occupation. First, recruitment/selection involves overcoming individuals' aversion to dirty work by selecting individuals with an affinity for the work and providing a realistic stigma preview. Second, socialization involves helping newcomers adjust to distasteful tasks and to stigma by using targeted divestiture, developing perspective taking, helping newcomers manage external relationships, and utilizing desensitization or immersion. Third, ongoing management roles involve cementing individuals' fit by fostering social validation, protecting workers from dirty work hazards, and negotiating the frontstage/backstage boundary. The practices identified as congruence work highlight the important role that managers can play in facilitating adjustment for both “dirty workers” and presumably their less stigmatized counterparts.

AB - Although research has established that it is often difficult for individuals engaged in dirty work to adjust to stigma and the attributes giving rise to stigma, little theory or empirical work addresses how managers may help workers adjust to dirty work. Interviews with managers across 18 dirty work occupations—physically tainted (e.g., animal control), socially tainted (e.g., corrections), and morally tainted (e.g., exotic entertainment)—indicate that managers engage in “congruence work”: behaviors, sensemaking, and sensegiving that they perceive as helping individuals adjust and develop a stronger sense of person–environment fit. Specifically, congruence work focuses on 3 phases of managerial practices that correspond to individuals' growing experience in the occupation. First, recruitment/selection involves overcoming individuals' aversion to dirty work by selecting individuals with an affinity for the work and providing a realistic stigma preview. Second, socialization involves helping newcomers adjust to distasteful tasks and to stigma by using targeted divestiture, developing perspective taking, helping newcomers manage external relationships, and utilizing desensitization or immersion. Third, ongoing management roles involve cementing individuals' fit by fostering social validation, protecting workers from dirty work hazards, and negotiating the frontstage/backstage boundary. The practices identified as congruence work highlight the important role that managers can play in facilitating adjustment for both “dirty workers” and presumably their less stigmatized counterparts.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85019635181&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85019635181&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/job.2201

DO - 10.1002/job.2201

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85019635181

VL - 38

SP - 1260

EP - 1279

JO - Journal of Organizational Behavior

JF - Journal of Organizational Behavior

SN - 0894-3796

IS - 8

ER -