Connectivity of Caribbean coral populations

Complementary insights from empirical and modelled gene flow

Nicola L. Foster, Claire B. Paris, Johnathan T. Kool, Iliana Brigitta Baums, Jamie R. Stevens, Juan A. Sanchez, Carolina Bastidas, Claudia Agudelo, Phillippe Bush, Owen Day, Renata Ferrari, Patricia Gonzalez, Shannon Gore, Reia Guppy, Michael A. McCartney, Croy McCoy, Judith Mendes, Ashwanth Srinivasan, Sascha Steiner, Mark J.A. Vermeij & 2 others Ernesto Weil, Peter J. Mumby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

102 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding patterns of connectivity among populations of marine organisms is essential for the development of realistic, spatially explicit models of population dynamics. Two approaches, empirical genetic patterns and oceanographic dispersal modelling, have been used to estimate levels of evolutionary connectivity among marine populations but rarely have their potentially complementary insights been combined. Here, a spatially realistic Lagrangian model of larval dispersal and a theoretical genetic model are integrated with the most extensive study of gene flow in a Caribbean marine organism. The 871 genets collected from 26 sites spread over the wider Caribbean subsampled 45.8% of the 1900 potential unique genets in the model. At a coarse scale, significant consensus between modelled estimates of genetic structure and empirical genetic data for populations of the reef-building coral Montastraea annularis is observed. However, modelled and empirical data differ in their estimates of connectivity among northern Mesoamerican reefs indicating that processes other than dispersal may dominate here. Further, the geographic location and porosity of the previously described east-west barrier to gene flow in the Caribbean is refined. A multi-prong approach, integrating genetic data and spatially realistic models of larval dispersal and genetic projection, provides complementary insights into the processes underpinning population connectivity in marine invertebrates on evolutionary timescales.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1143-1157
Number of pages15
JournalMolecular ecology
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

Fingerprint

Anthozoa
Gene Flow
gene flow
Viverridae
connectivity
corals
Aquatic Organisms
coral
genet
Coral Reefs
Population
Geographic Locations
Genetic Structures
Porosity
Genetic Models
Population Genetics
Population Dynamics
Invertebrates
reef
reefs

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics

Cite this

Foster, Nicola L. ; Paris, Claire B. ; Kool, Johnathan T. ; Baums, Iliana Brigitta ; Stevens, Jamie R. ; Sanchez, Juan A. ; Bastidas, Carolina ; Agudelo, Claudia ; Bush, Phillippe ; Day, Owen ; Ferrari, Renata ; Gonzalez, Patricia ; Gore, Shannon ; Guppy, Reia ; McCartney, Michael A. ; McCoy, Croy ; Mendes, Judith ; Srinivasan, Ashwanth ; Steiner, Sascha ; Vermeij, Mark J.A. ; Weil, Ernesto ; Mumby, Peter J. / Connectivity of Caribbean coral populations : Complementary insights from empirical and modelled gene flow. In: Molecular ecology. 2012 ; Vol. 21, No. 5. pp. 1143-1157.
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Foster, NL, Paris, CB, Kool, JT, Baums, IB, Stevens, JR, Sanchez, JA, Bastidas, C, Agudelo, C, Bush, P, Day, O, Ferrari, R, Gonzalez, P, Gore, S, Guppy, R, McCartney, MA, McCoy, C, Mendes, J, Srinivasan, A, Steiner, S, Vermeij, MJA, Weil, E & Mumby, PJ 2012, 'Connectivity of Caribbean coral populations: Complementary insights from empirical and modelled gene flow', Molecular ecology, vol. 21, no. 5, pp. 1143-1157. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2012.05455.x

Connectivity of Caribbean coral populations : Complementary insights from empirical and modelled gene flow. / Foster, Nicola L.; Paris, Claire B.; Kool, Johnathan T.; Baums, Iliana Brigitta; Stevens, Jamie R.; Sanchez, Juan A.; Bastidas, Carolina; Agudelo, Claudia; Bush, Phillippe; Day, Owen; Ferrari, Renata; Gonzalez, Patricia; Gore, Shannon; Guppy, Reia; McCartney, Michael A.; McCoy, Croy; Mendes, Judith; Srinivasan, Ashwanth; Steiner, Sascha; Vermeij, Mark J.A.; Weil, Ernesto; Mumby, Peter J.

In: Molecular ecology, Vol. 21, No. 5, 01.03.2012, p. 1143-1157.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Connectivity of Caribbean coral populations

T2 - Complementary insights from empirical and modelled gene flow

AU - Foster, Nicola L.

AU - Paris, Claire B.

AU - Kool, Johnathan T.

AU - Baums, Iliana Brigitta

AU - Stevens, Jamie R.

AU - Sanchez, Juan A.

AU - Bastidas, Carolina

AU - Agudelo, Claudia

AU - Bush, Phillippe

AU - Day, Owen

AU - Ferrari, Renata

AU - Gonzalez, Patricia

AU - Gore, Shannon

AU - Guppy, Reia

AU - McCartney, Michael A.

AU - McCoy, Croy

AU - Mendes, Judith

AU - Srinivasan, Ashwanth

AU - Steiner, Sascha

AU - Vermeij, Mark J.A.

AU - Weil, Ernesto

AU - Mumby, Peter J.

PY - 2012/3/1

Y1 - 2012/3/1

N2 - Understanding patterns of connectivity among populations of marine organisms is essential for the development of realistic, spatially explicit models of population dynamics. Two approaches, empirical genetic patterns and oceanographic dispersal modelling, have been used to estimate levels of evolutionary connectivity among marine populations but rarely have their potentially complementary insights been combined. Here, a spatially realistic Lagrangian model of larval dispersal and a theoretical genetic model are integrated with the most extensive study of gene flow in a Caribbean marine organism. The 871 genets collected from 26 sites spread over the wider Caribbean subsampled 45.8% of the 1900 potential unique genets in the model. At a coarse scale, significant consensus between modelled estimates of genetic structure and empirical genetic data for populations of the reef-building coral Montastraea annularis is observed. However, modelled and empirical data differ in their estimates of connectivity among northern Mesoamerican reefs indicating that processes other than dispersal may dominate here. Further, the geographic location and porosity of the previously described east-west barrier to gene flow in the Caribbean is refined. A multi-prong approach, integrating genetic data and spatially realistic models of larval dispersal and genetic projection, provides complementary insights into the processes underpinning population connectivity in marine invertebrates on evolutionary timescales.

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