Consequences of male partner violence for low-income minority women

Janel M. Leone, Michael P. Johnson, Catherine L. Cohan, Susan E. Lloyd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

101 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current study used a random sample of 563 low-income women to test Johnson's (1995) theory that there are two major forms of male-partner violence, situational couple violence and intimate terrorism, which are distinguished in terms of their embeddedness in a general pattern of control. The study examined the associations between type of violence experienced and respondents' physical health, psychological distress, and economic well-being. Analyses revealed three distinct patterns of partner violence: intimate terrorism, control/no threat, and situational couple violence. Compared to victims of control/no threat and situational couple violence, victims of intimate terrorism reported more injuries from physical violence and more work/activity time lost because of injuries. Compared to women who experienced no violence in the previous year, victims of intimate terrorism reported a greater likelihood of visiting a doctor, poorer health, more psychological distress, and a greater likelihood of receiving government assistance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)472-490
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Marriage and Family
Volume66
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

Fingerprint

low income
minority
violence
terrorism
threat
Minorities
Income
health
random sample
assistance
well-being
Terrorism
Situational
economics
Psychological Distress
Threat

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Leone, Janel M. ; Johnson, Michael P. ; Cohan, Catherine L. ; Lloyd, Susan E. / Consequences of male partner violence for low-income minority women. In: Journal of Marriage and Family. 2004 ; Vol. 66, No. 2. pp. 472-490.
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Consequences of male partner violence for low-income minority women. / Leone, Janel M.; Johnson, Michael P.; Cohan, Catherine L.; Lloyd, Susan E.

In: Journal of Marriage and Family, Vol. 66, No. 2, 01.01.2004, p. 472-490.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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