Conservation Geographies in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Politics of National Parks, Community Conservation and Peace Parks

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sub-Saharan Africa has been the location of intense conservation planning since the colonial era. Under the auspices of wilderness protection, colonial authorities established national parks largely for the purpose of hunting and tourism while forcibly evicting indigenous populations. Concerns about the ethical and economic impacts of protected areas have generated interest in community conservation initiatives that attempt to include local participation in natural resource management. In recent years, the anticipated loss of biodiversity, coupled with the integration of ecological concepts into planning processes, has generated interest in larger-scale initiatives that maximize protected habitat. Central to this shift are transboundary conservation areas, or Peace Parks, that involve protected territory that supersedes national political borders. This study provides a review of national parks, community conservation, and Peace Parks, in order to understand the development politics and governance challenges of global conservation. Although these approaches are not mutually exclusive, the study asserts that they represent major trajectories to conservation planning in Sub-Saharan Africa and other parts of the developing world. In considering the histories of these models in Sub-Saharan Africa, I argue that conservation planners often prioritize economic and ecological factors over the political circumstances that influence the effectiveness of these approaches. The study concludes by suggesting that an analysis of these three models provides a lens to examine ongoing debates regarding the employ of conservation as an economic development strategy and the challenges to environmental governance in the 21st century.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14-27
Number of pages14
JournalGeography Compass
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Fingerprint

national park
Conservation
peace
politics
conservation
geography
community
conservation planning
protected area
political border
Planning
indigenous population
Economics
local participation
twenty first century
development strategy
planning process
economic impact
hunting
Natural resources management

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Water Science and Technology
  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Computers in Earth Sciences
  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

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Conservation Geographies in Sub-Saharan Africa : The Politics of National Parks, Community Conservation and Peace Parks. / King, Brian.

In: Geography Compass, Vol. 4, No. 1, 01.01.2010, p. 14-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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