Conservation of Resources theory in the context of multiple roles: An analysis of within- and cross-role mediational pathways

Rosalind Chait Barnett, Robert T. Brennan, Karen C. Gareis, Karen A. Ertel, Lisa F. Berkman, David M. Almeida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Based on the Conservation of Resources theory, we used data from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS I, 1995-1996; N=1779) to estimate by covariance structure analysis the direct and indirect effects of work and family demands, resources, and support on psychological distress. In a new application of the theory, we estimated six within-role mediational pathways linking work-related predictors to psychological distress through work interfering with family (WIF) and family-related predictors to psychological distress through family interfering with work (FIW). Finally, in a departure from previous work-family research, we estimated six cross-role mediational pathways linking work-related predictors to psychological distress through FIW and family-related predictors to psychological distress through WIF. Ten of the 12 hypothesized mediational effects were significant and another was marginally significant, supporting the mediational role of work-family conflict within Conservation of Resources theory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-148
Number of pages18
JournalCommunity, Work and Family
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2012

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conservation
resource
resources
family research
family work
family
analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Development
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Barnett, Rosalind Chait ; Brennan, Robert T. ; Gareis, Karen C. ; Ertel, Karen A. ; Berkman, Lisa F. ; Almeida, David M. / Conservation of Resources theory in the context of multiple roles : An analysis of within- and cross-role mediational pathways. In: Community, Work and Family. 2012 ; Vol. 15, No. 2. pp. 131-148.
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Conservation of Resources theory in the context of multiple roles : An analysis of within- and cross-role mediational pathways. / Barnett, Rosalind Chait; Brennan, Robert T.; Gareis, Karen C.; Ertel, Karen A.; Berkman, Lisa F.; Almeida, David M.

In: Community, Work and Family, Vol. 15, No. 2, 01.05.2012, p. 131-148.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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