Conservation of Resources theory in the context of multiple roles: An analysis of within- and cross-role mediational pathways

Rosalind Chait Barnett, Robert T. Brennan, Karen C. Gareis, Karen A. Ertel, Lisa F. Berkman, David M. Almeida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Based on the Conservation of Resources theory, we used data from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS I, 1995-1996; N=1779) to estimate by covariance structure analysis the direct and indirect effects of work and family demands, resources, and support on psychological distress. In a new application of the theory, we estimated six within-role mediational pathways linking work-related predictors to psychological distress through work interfering with family (WIF) and family-related predictors to psychological distress through family interfering with work (FIW). Finally, in a departure from previous work-family research, we estimated six cross-role mediational pathways linking work-related predictors to psychological distress through FIW and family-related predictors to psychological distress through WIF. Ten of the 12 hypothesized mediational effects were significant and another was marginally significant, supporting the mediational role of work-family conflict within Conservation of Resources theory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-148
Number of pages18
JournalCommunity, Work and Family
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Development
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences(all)

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