Considering the Genetic and Environmental Overlap Between Bullying Victimization, Delinquency, and Symptoms of Depression/Anxiety

Eric J. Connolly, Kevin M. Beaver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Emerging evidence from longitudinal research suggests that bullied children are more likely to develop antisocial tendencies and mental health problems later in life. Less research, however, has used genetically sensitive research designs to control for genetic confounding and examine whether the well-supported association between bullying victimization and maladaptive development is partially accounted for by common genetic and environmental influences. Using sibling data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, the current study used a series of bivariate liability-threshold models to disentangle the genetic and environmental influences on observed covariance between repeated bullying victimization, delinquent involvement, and symptoms of depression/anxiety. Results revealed that common additive genetic and nonshared environmental effects accounted for the covariance in liability between bullying victimization and delinquent involvement as well as bullying victimization and symptoms of depression/anxiety. The results suggest the presence of genotype–environment correlation (rGE) between repeated victimization and maladaptive development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1230-1256
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume31
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Considering the Genetic and Environmental Overlap Between Bullying Victimization, Delinquency, and Symptoms of Depression/Anxiety'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this