Consumer mindsets matter: Benefit framing and firm–cause fit in the persuasiveness of cause-related marketing campaigns

Ozge Yucel-Aybat, Meng-hua Hsieh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The current research investigates the factors associated with the efficacy of cause-related marketing campaigns. A pilot study and three experiments using different supported causes demonstrate that consumers’ beliefs about changeability influence their responses to CRM efforts. Specifically, we examine under what conditions and why self-benefit frames (vs. other-benefit frames), which highlight how supporting a cause can also be beneficial for consumers (vs. emphasize helping those in need), promote or inhibit the persuasiveness of CRM campaigns. We demonstrate that growth mindsets respond more positively to CRM campaigns with other-benefit (vs. self-benefit) frames when the fit between the firm and the supported cause is high. The findings show that procedural-fairness beliefs and positive-outcome perceptions drive this effect. Conversely, fixed mindsets respond more favorably to CRM campaigns focused on helping others when the firm–cause fit is lower. Positive-outcome perceptions appear to drive this effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)418-427
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Business Research
Volume129
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Marketing

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