Consumer preferences for tabletop Christmas trees

Bridget K. Behe, Rachel M. Walden, Marcus W. Duck, Bert M. Cregg, Kathleen M. Kelley, R. D. Lineberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

An aging American population may be less willing than a younger population to install and remove a live, fresh-cut evergreen tree in their home for Christmas celebrations. An alternative to using traditional, large, fresh-cut or potted Christmas trees could be forcing these evergreen species in a small (≈1-L) container that could be displayed on a tabletop. We initiated this study to determine consumer preferences and marketability for six evergreen tree species produced for tabletop display and used three decoration themes and three price points. We constructed a web-based survey in which 331 participants were compensated with a $5 e-coupon for viewing 27 photographs of tabletop trees and providing preference and use information. The conjoint model accounted for 91.2% of the variance and showed that consumers valued tree species as the most important attribute (61% of the tree value), with decoration color/theme the second most important feature (27%) and, last, price (12%). Black Hills spruce (Picea glauca var. densata (Moench) Voss) was the most preferred species overall, and red was the most preferred decoration theme. Logically, the lowest price point was the most preferred. However, price was the most important attribute for participants younger than 25 years. The importance of price decreased as participant age increased until age 60, when price became a more important component With a cost of production of $5.45 and decoration and shipping estimated at an additional $4.00, the product could be a profit generator priced at any of the tested price points ($14.95 and above).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)409-412
Number of pages4
JournalHortScience
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2005

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Horticulture

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    Behe, B. K., Walden, R. M., Duck, M. W., Cregg, B. M., Kelley, K. M., & Lineberger, R. D. (2005). Consumer preferences for tabletop Christmas trees. HortScience, 40(2), 409-412. https://doi.org/10.21273/hortsci.40.2.409