Consumer sleep technologies: A review of the landscape

Ping Ru T Ko, Julie A. Kientz, Eun Kyoung Choe, Matthew Kay, Carol A. Landis, Nathaniel F. Watson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To review sleep related consumer technologies, including mobile electronic device "apps," wearable devices, and other technologies. Validation and methodological transparency, the effect on clinical sleep medicine, and various social, legal, and ethical issues are discussed. Methods: We reviewed publications from the digital libraries of the Association for Computing Machinery, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and PubMed; publications from consumer technology websites; and mobile device app marketplaces. Search terms included "sleep technology," "sleep app," and "sleep monitoring." Results: Consumer sleep technologies are categorized by delivery platform including mobile device apps (integrated with a mobile operating system and utilizing mobile device functions such as the camera or microphone), wearable devices (on the body or attached to clothing), embedded devices (integrated into furniture or other fixtures in the native sleep environment), accessory appliances, and conventional desktop/website resources. Their primary goals include facilitation of sleep induction or wakening, self-guided sleep assessment, entertainment, social connection, information sharing, and sleep education. Conclusions: Consumer sleep technologies are changing the landscape of sleep health and clinical sleep medicine. These technologies have the potential to both improve and impair collective and individual sleep health depending on method of implementation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1455-1461
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
Volume11
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Sleep
Technology
Equipment and Supplies
Mobile Applications
Clinical Medicine
Publications
Library Associations
Digital Libraries
Interior Design and Furnishings
Clothing
Information Dissemination
Polysomnography
Health
PubMed
Ethics
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Ko, P. R. T., Kientz, J. A., Choe, E. K., Kay, M., Landis, C. A., & Watson, N. F. (2015). Consumer sleep technologies: A review of the landscape. Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, 11(12), 1455-1461. https://doi.org/10.5664/jcsm.5288
Ko, Ping Ru T ; Kientz, Julie A. ; Choe, Eun Kyoung ; Kay, Matthew ; Landis, Carol A. ; Watson, Nathaniel F. / Consumer sleep technologies : A review of the landscape. In: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 11, No. 12. pp. 1455-1461.
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Ko, PRT, Kientz, JA, Choe, EK, Kay, M, Landis, CA & Watson, NF 2015, 'Consumer sleep technologies: A review of the landscape', Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, vol. 11, no. 12, pp. 1455-1461. https://doi.org/10.5664/jcsm.5288

Consumer sleep technologies : A review of the landscape. / Ko, Ping Ru T; Kientz, Julie A.; Choe, Eun Kyoung; Kay, Matthew; Landis, Carol A.; Watson, Nathaniel F.

In: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, Vol. 11, No. 12, 01.01.2015, p. 1455-1461.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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AU - Watson, Nathaniel F.

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Ko PRT, Kientz JA, Choe EK, Kay M, Landis CA, Watson NF. Consumer sleep technologies: A review of the landscape. Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. 2015 Jan 1;11(12):1455-1461. https://doi.org/10.5664/jcsm.5288