Contact dermatitis associated with food: Retrospective cross-sectional analysis of North American contact dermatitis group data, 2001-2004

Erin M. Warshaw, Nina C. Botto, Kathryn A. Zug, Donald V. Belsito, Howard I. Maibach, Denis Sasseville, Joseph F. Fowler, Frances J. Storrs, James S. Taylor, Vincent A. Deleo, James G. Marks, C. G.Toby Mathias, Melanie D. Pratt, Robert L. Rietschel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Allergic and irritant contact dermatitis to food is likely underreported. Objectives: To characterize relevant allergens and irritants associated with food in patients referred to the North American Contact Dermatitis Group (NACDG) for patch testing. Methods: Retrospective analysis of cross-sectional data from the NACDG from 2001 to 2004. Results: Of 10,061 patch-tested patients, 109 (1.1%) had a total of 122 reactions associated with food. Approximately two-thirds of patients (66%) were female, and one-third (36%) were atopic. The hands were the most common sites of dermatitis (36.7%). There were 78 currently relevant (definite, probable, or possible) allergic reactions to NACDG standard series allergens with a food source; the most common allergen was nickel (48.7%), followed by Myroxilon pereirae (balsam of Peru) (20.6%) and propylene glycol (6.4%). Twenty allergic reactions to non-NACDG standard allergens and 24 relevant food irritants were also identified. Overall, 21% (25 of 122) of all reactions (irritant and allergic) were occupation related; the majority of these (17 of 25) were relevant irritant reactions. Cooks were the most commonly affected occupational group (40%). Conclusions: In this limited data set, nickel, Myroxilon pereirae, and propylene glycol were the most common allergens identified with a food source. Of food-related occupational disease, irritation was more common than allergy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)252-260
Number of pages9
JournalDermatitis
Volume19
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2008

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Dermatology

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