Context matters: plasticity in response to pheromones regulating reproduction and collective behavior in social Hymenoptera

Margarita Orlova, Etya Amsalem

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Pheromones mediating social behavior are critical components in the cohesion and function of the colony and are instrumental in the evolution of eusocial insect species. However, different aspects of colony function, such as reproductive division of labor and colony maintenance (e.g. foraging, brood care, and defense), pose different challenges for the optimal function of pheromones. While reproductive communication is shaped by forces of conflict and competition, colony maintenance calls for enhanced cooperation and self-organization. Mechanisms that ensure efficacy, adaptivity and evolutionary stability of signals such as structure-to-function suitability, honesty and context are important to all chemical signals but vary to different degrees between pheromones regulating reproductive division of labor and colony maintenance. In this review, we will discuss these differences along with the mechanisms that have evolved to ensure pheromone adaptivity in reproductive and non-reproductive context.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)69-76
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent Opinion in Insect Science
Volume35
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

Fingerprint

group behavior
pheromone
pheromones
plasticity
Hymenoptera
polyethism
labor division
brood rearing
cohesion
social behavior
self organization
animal communication
foraging
insects
communication
insect

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Insect Science

Cite this

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abstract = "Pheromones mediating social behavior are critical components in the cohesion and function of the colony and are instrumental in the evolution of eusocial insect species. However, different aspects of colony function, such as reproductive division of labor and colony maintenance (e.g. foraging, brood care, and defense), pose different challenges for the optimal function of pheromones. While reproductive communication is shaped by forces of conflict and competition, colony maintenance calls for enhanced cooperation and self-organization. Mechanisms that ensure efficacy, adaptivity and evolutionary stability of signals such as structure-to-function suitability, honesty and context are important to all chemical signals but vary to different degrees between pheromones regulating reproductive division of labor and colony maintenance. In this review, we will discuss these differences along with the mechanisms that have evolved to ensure pheromone adaptivity in reproductive and non-reproductive context.",
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Context matters : plasticity in response to pheromones regulating reproduction and collective behavior in social Hymenoptera. / Orlova, Margarita; Amsalem, Etya.

In: Current Opinion in Insect Science, Vol. 35, 01.10.2019, p. 69-76.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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