Continuous Shear Wave Elastography: A New Method to Measure Viscoelastic Properties of Tendons in Vivo

Daniel Humbe Cortes Correales, Stephen M. Suydam, Karin Grävare Silbernagel, Thomas S. Buchanan, Dawn M. Elliott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Viscoelastic mechanical properties are frequently altered after tendon injuries and during recovery. Therefore, non-invasive measurements of shear viscoelastic properties may help evaluate tendon recovery and compare the effectiveness of different therapies. The objectives of this study were to describe an elastography method for measuring localized viscoelastic properties of tendons and to discuss the initial results in healthy and injured human Achilles and semitendinosus tendons. The technique used an external actuator to generate the shear waves in the tendon at different frequencies and plane wave imaging to measure shear wave displacements. For each of the excitation frequencies, maps of direction-specific wave speeds were calculated using local frequency estimation. Maps of viscoelastic properties were obtained using a pixel-wise curve fit of wave speed and frequency. The method was validated by comparing measurements of wave speed in agarose gels with those obtained using magnetic resonance elastography. Measurements in human healthy Achilles tendons revealed a pronounced increase in wave speed as a function of frequency, which highlights the importance of tendon viscoelasticity. Additionally, the viscoelastic properties of the Achilles tendon were larger than those reported for other tissues. Measurements in a tendinopathic Achilles tendon indicated that it is feasible to quantify local viscoelastic properties. Similarly, measurement in the semitendinosus tendon revealed substantial differences in viscoelastic properties between the healthy and contralateral tendons. Consequently, this technique has the potential to evaluate localized changes in tendon viscoelastic properties caused by injury and during recovery in a clinical setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1518-1529
Number of pages12
JournalUltrasound in Medicine and Biology
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

Fingerprint

Elasticity Imaging Techniques
tendons
Tendons
S waves
Achilles Tendon
Tendon Injuries
recovery
Sepharose
Gels
viscoelasticity
Wounds and Injuries
magnetic resonance
therapy
plane waves

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Cortes Correales, Daniel Humbe ; Suydam, Stephen M. ; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare ; Buchanan, Thomas S. ; Elliott, Dawn M. / Continuous Shear Wave Elastography : A New Method to Measure Viscoelastic Properties of Tendons in Vivo. In: Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. 2015 ; Vol. 41, No. 6. pp. 1518-1529.
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Continuous Shear Wave Elastography : A New Method to Measure Viscoelastic Properties of Tendons in Vivo. / Cortes Correales, Daniel Humbe; Suydam, Stephen M.; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Elliott, Dawn M.

In: Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology, Vol. 41, No. 6, 01.06.2015, p. 1518-1529.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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