Contralateral cranial polyneuropathy due to perineural invasion by a cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

Arun N.E. Sundaram, Zachary Simmons, Javad Towfighi, Jonas Sheehan, Raymond Reichwein

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cutaneous malignancies may spread to underlying nerves, a process known as perineural invasion (PNI). We report a patient who was found to have PNI presenting as a cranial polyneuropathy on the contralateral side of the face many years after the resection of a squamous cell carcinoma. All diagnostic testing was unrevealing until nerve biopsy was performed. This emphasizes the long asymptomatic period between treatment of a cutaneous malignancy and detection of PNI, and the development of PNI at a site distant from the original malignancy. Biopsy of a clinically involved nerve may permit diagnosis of PNI when other studies are normal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)132-136
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Neuromuscular Disease
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

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Polyneuropathies
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Skin
Biopsy
Neoplasms
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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abstract = "Cutaneous malignancies may spread to underlying nerves, a process known as perineural invasion (PNI). We report a patient who was found to have PNI presenting as a cranial polyneuropathy on the contralateral side of the face many years after the resection of a squamous cell carcinoma. All diagnostic testing was unrevealing until nerve biopsy was performed. This emphasizes the long asymptomatic period between treatment of a cutaneous malignancy and detection of PNI, and the development of PNI at a site distant from the original malignancy. Biopsy of a clinically involved nerve may permit diagnosis of PNI when other studies are normal.",
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Contralateral cranial polyneuropathy due to perineural invasion by a cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. / Sundaram, Arun N.E.; Simmons, Zachary; Towfighi, Javad; Sheehan, Jonas; Reichwein, Raymond.

In: Journal of Clinical Neuromuscular Disease, Vol. 11, No. 3, 01.03.2010, p. 132-136.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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T1 - Contralateral cranial polyneuropathy due to perineural invasion by a cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

AU - Sundaram, Arun N.E.

AU - Simmons, Zachary

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AU - Sheehan, Jonas

AU - Reichwein, Raymond

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AB - Cutaneous malignancies may spread to underlying nerves, a process known as perineural invasion (PNI). We report a patient who was found to have PNI presenting as a cranial polyneuropathy on the contralateral side of the face many years after the resection of a squamous cell carcinoma. All diagnostic testing was unrevealing until nerve biopsy was performed. This emphasizes the long asymptomatic period between treatment of a cutaneous malignancy and detection of PNI, and the development of PNI at a site distant from the original malignancy. Biopsy of a clinically involved nerve may permit diagnosis of PNI when other studies are normal.

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