Converging-diverging design strategies in a sophomore level design sequence: Review of an electromechanical project

Paris R. Vonlockette, Eric Constans, Jennifer Courtney, Kevin Dahm, William Riddell, Roberta Harvey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

At our university Sophomore Clinics I and II are part of an eight-semester design sequence in which students progress from basic data collection and reverse engineering projects through more open-ended, industry-sponsored capstone design experiences. The team of multidisciplinary faculty from Engineering and Communications who teach the sophomore level courses have observed the difficulty students have tackling the fundamental open-ended nature of true design problems and have subsequently revised the sequence. For the Fall of 2005 the Sophomore Clinic sequence was revised to introduce Dym et al. 's converging-diverging framework for design by incorporating a series of three projects of increasing complexity with accompany activities designed to reinforce the converging-diverging concepts. For the third project in the series, roughly sixty students participated in an open-ended electromechanical design project that included lectures and activities to reinforce the design framework, assessment of the retention/comprehension of the framework's concepts, and a final design competition. While assessment data was unable to show a correlation between comprehension of the design framework and improvements in students' designs, results do show that students had adequate retention/comprehension of the converging-diverging philosophy and that students' designs performed better in the competition following the revised course as compared to the previous year.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings
StatePublished - 2007

Fingerprint

Students
Reverse engineering
Communication
Industry

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

@article{d11d1e79764f4f80a0a5f2f715824874,
title = "Converging-diverging design strategies in a sophomore level design sequence: Review of an electromechanical project",
abstract = "At our university Sophomore Clinics I and II are part of an eight-semester design sequence in which students progress from basic data collection and reverse engineering projects through more open-ended, industry-sponsored capstone design experiences. The team of multidisciplinary faculty from Engineering and Communications who teach the sophomore level courses have observed the difficulty students have tackling the fundamental open-ended nature of true design problems and have subsequently revised the sequence. For the Fall of 2005 the Sophomore Clinic sequence was revised to introduce Dym et al. 's converging-diverging framework for design by incorporating a series of three projects of increasing complexity with accompany activities designed to reinforce the converging-diverging concepts. For the third project in the series, roughly sixty students participated in an open-ended electromechanical design project that included lectures and activities to reinforce the design framework, assessment of the retention/comprehension of the framework's concepts, and a final design competition. While assessment data was unable to show a correlation between comprehension of the design framework and improvements in students' designs, results do show that students had adequate retention/comprehension of the converging-diverging philosophy and that students' designs performed better in the competition following the revised course as compared to the previous year.",
author = "Vonlockette, {Paris R.} and Eric Constans and Jennifer Courtney and Kevin Dahm and William Riddell and Roberta Harvey",
year = "2007",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings",
issn = "2153-5965",

}

Converging-diverging design strategies in a sophomore level design sequence : Review of an electromechanical project. / Vonlockette, Paris R.; Constans, Eric; Courtney, Jennifer; Dahm, Kevin; Riddell, William; Harvey, Roberta.

In: ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings, 2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Converging-diverging design strategies in a sophomore level design sequence

T2 - Review of an electromechanical project

AU - Vonlockette, Paris R.

AU - Constans, Eric

AU - Courtney, Jennifer

AU - Dahm, Kevin

AU - Riddell, William

AU - Harvey, Roberta

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - At our university Sophomore Clinics I and II are part of an eight-semester design sequence in which students progress from basic data collection and reverse engineering projects through more open-ended, industry-sponsored capstone design experiences. The team of multidisciplinary faculty from Engineering and Communications who teach the sophomore level courses have observed the difficulty students have tackling the fundamental open-ended nature of true design problems and have subsequently revised the sequence. For the Fall of 2005 the Sophomore Clinic sequence was revised to introduce Dym et al. 's converging-diverging framework for design by incorporating a series of three projects of increasing complexity with accompany activities designed to reinforce the converging-diverging concepts. For the third project in the series, roughly sixty students participated in an open-ended electromechanical design project that included lectures and activities to reinforce the design framework, assessment of the retention/comprehension of the framework's concepts, and a final design competition. While assessment data was unable to show a correlation between comprehension of the design framework and improvements in students' designs, results do show that students had adequate retention/comprehension of the converging-diverging philosophy and that students' designs performed better in the competition following the revised course as compared to the previous year.

AB - At our university Sophomore Clinics I and II are part of an eight-semester design sequence in which students progress from basic data collection and reverse engineering projects through more open-ended, industry-sponsored capstone design experiences. The team of multidisciplinary faculty from Engineering and Communications who teach the sophomore level courses have observed the difficulty students have tackling the fundamental open-ended nature of true design problems and have subsequently revised the sequence. For the Fall of 2005 the Sophomore Clinic sequence was revised to introduce Dym et al. 's converging-diverging framework for design by incorporating a series of three projects of increasing complexity with accompany activities designed to reinforce the converging-diverging concepts. For the third project in the series, roughly sixty students participated in an open-ended electromechanical design project that included lectures and activities to reinforce the design framework, assessment of the retention/comprehension of the framework's concepts, and a final design competition. While assessment data was unable to show a correlation between comprehension of the design framework and improvements in students' designs, results do show that students had adequate retention/comprehension of the converging-diverging philosophy and that students' designs performed better in the competition following the revised course as compared to the previous year.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85029071038&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85029071038&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85029071038

JO - ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings

JF - ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings

SN - 2153-5965

ER -