Cooling the tip of a turbine blade using pressure side holes - Part 2

Heat transfer measurements

J. R. Christophel, Karen Ann Thole, F. J. Cunha

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The clearance gap between a turbine blade tip and its associated shroud allows leakage flow across the tip gap from the pressure side to the suction side of the blade. Understanding how this leakage flow affects heat transfer is critical in extending blade tip durability in terms of oxidation, erosion, clearance, and overall turbine performance. This paper is the second of a two part series that discusses the augmentation of tip heat transfer as a result of blowing from the pressure side of the tip as well as dirt purge holes placed on the tip. For the experimental investigation, three scaled-up blades were used to form a two-passage linear cascade in a low speed wind tunnel. The rig was designed to simulate different tip gap sizes and coolant flow rates. Heat transfer coefficients were quantified by measuring the total power supplied to a constant heat flux surface placed on the tip of the blade and measuring the tip temperatures. Results indicate that increased blowing leads to increased augmentations in tip heat transfer, particularly at the entrance region to the gap. When combined with adiabatic effectiveness measurements, the coolant from the pressure side holes provides an overall net heat flux reduction to the blade tip but is nearly independent of coolant flow levels.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages273-282
    Number of pages10
    StatePublished - Dec 22 2004
    Event2004 ASME Turbo Expo - Vienna, Austria
    Duration: Jun 14 2004Jun 17 2004

    Other

    Other2004 ASME Turbo Expo
    CountryAustria
    CityVienna
    Period6/14/046/17/04

    Fingerprint

    Coolants
    Turbomachine blades
    Turbines
    Blow molding
    Heat transfer
    Cooling
    Heat flux
    Heat transfer coefficients
    Wind tunnels
    Erosion
    Durability
    Flow rate
    Oxidation
    Temperature

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Engineering(all)

    Cite this

    Christophel, J. R., Thole, K. A., & Cunha, F. J. (2004). Cooling the tip of a turbine blade using pressure side holes - Part 2: Heat transfer measurements. 273-282. Paper presented at 2004 ASME Turbo Expo, Vienna, Austria.
    Christophel, J. R. ; Thole, Karen Ann ; Cunha, F. J. / Cooling the tip of a turbine blade using pressure side holes - Part 2 : Heat transfer measurements. Paper presented at 2004 ASME Turbo Expo, Vienna, Austria.10 p.
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    Christophel, JR, Thole, KA & Cunha, FJ 2004, 'Cooling the tip of a turbine blade using pressure side holes - Part 2: Heat transfer measurements' Paper presented at 2004 ASME Turbo Expo, Vienna, Austria, 6/14/04 - 6/17/04, pp. 273-282.

    Cooling the tip of a turbine blade using pressure side holes - Part 2 : Heat transfer measurements. / Christophel, J. R.; Thole, Karen Ann; Cunha, F. J.

    2004. 273-282 Paper presented at 2004 ASME Turbo Expo, Vienna, Austria.

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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    Christophel JR, Thole KA, Cunha FJ. Cooling the tip of a turbine blade using pressure side holes - Part 2: Heat transfer measurements. 2004. Paper presented at 2004 ASME Turbo Expo, Vienna, Austria.