Correlates of adherence to a telephone-based multiple health behavior change cancer preventive intervention for teens: The healthy for life program (help)

Darren Mays, Beth N. Peshkin, McKane E. Sharff, Leslie R. Walker, Anisha A. Abraham, Kirsten B. Hawkins, Kenneth P. Tercyak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined factors associated with teens' adherence to a multiple health behavior cancer preventive intervention. Analyses identified predictors of trial enrollment, run-in completion, and adherence (intervention initiation, number of sessions completed). Of 104 teens screened, 73% (n = 76) were trial eligible. White teens were more likely to enroll than non-Whites (χ 2[1] df =4.49, p =.04). Among enrolled teens, 76% (n = 50) completed the run-in; there were no differences between run-in completers and noncompleters. A majority of run-in completers (70%, n = 35) initiated the intervention, though teens who initiated the intervention were significantly younger than those who did not (p <.05). The mean number of sessions completed was 5.7 (SD = 2.6; maximum = 8). After adjusting for age, teens with poorer session engagement (e.g., less cooperative) completed fewer sessions (B = -1.97, p =.003, R 2 =.24). Implications for adolescent cancer prevention research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-26
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Education and Behavior
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2012

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Health Behavior
Telephone
Neoplasms
Cancer
Adherence
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Mays, Darren ; Peshkin, Beth N. ; Sharff, McKane E. ; Walker, Leslie R. ; Abraham, Anisha A. ; Hawkins, Kirsten B. ; Tercyak, Kenneth P. / Correlates of adherence to a telephone-based multiple health behavior change cancer preventive intervention for teens : The healthy for life program (help). In: Health Education and Behavior. 2012 ; Vol. 39, No. 1. pp. 18-26.
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Correlates of adherence to a telephone-based multiple health behavior change cancer preventive intervention for teens : The healthy for life program (help). / Mays, Darren; Peshkin, Beth N.; Sharff, McKane E.; Walker, Leslie R.; Abraham, Anisha A.; Hawkins, Kirsten B.; Tercyak, Kenneth P.

In: Health Education and Behavior, Vol. 39, No. 1, 01.02.2012, p. 18-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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