Correlates of coparenting during infancy

Eric Lindsey, Yvonne Caldera, Malinda Colwell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined family characteristics associated with the coparenting behavior of 60 parents with an 11- to 15-month-old infant (30 boys, 30 girls) during a structured triadic play session. Mothers reported on family demographics, social support, and child temperament. Both parents reported on their self-esteem and childrearing beliefs. Fathers displayed more supportive coparenting behavior than mothers. Mothers' intrusive coparenting behavior differed based on the number of children, parent's employment status, and child gender. Social support, parental self-esteem, and child temperament were significant correlates of individual coparenting behavior. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for family theory and family practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)346-359
Number of pages14
JournalFamily Relations
Volume54
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2005

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parents
Temperament
Parents
Mothers
Self Concept
Social Support
self-esteem
social support
Family Practice
number of children
Fathers
infant
father
Demography
gender

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Lindsey, Eric ; Caldera, Yvonne ; Colwell, Malinda. / Correlates of coparenting during infancy. In: Family Relations. 2005 ; Vol. 54, No. 3. pp. 346-359.
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Correlates of coparenting during infancy. / Lindsey, Eric; Caldera, Yvonne; Colwell, Malinda.

In: Family Relations, Vol. 54, No. 3, 01.07.2005, p. 346-359.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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