Cost-utility analysis of smoking cessation to prevent operative complications following elective abdominal colon surgery

Audrey S. Kulaylat, Christopher S. Hollenbeak, David I. Soybel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Smoking is a known risk factor for postoperative complications after colectomy. Using the perspective of the provider, this study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of the pharmacologic interventions for smoking cessation. Methods: A decision tree model was constructed to represent a provider's decision to provide either bupropion, nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline, or no cessation therapy to all patients presenting for elective colectomy. Incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) was the primary outcome. Results: The base case analysis suggests that bupropion is cost-effective with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of approximately $75,000 per QALY. Sensitivity analyses established ranges for which each medication might be cost-effective and dominant compared to offering no cessation therapy. Conclusions: From a provider perspective, offering bupropion for smoking cessation to patients scheduled for elective colon resection is cost-effective. Furthermore, these results provide benchmarks to inform providers about whether targeted, short-term smoking cessation therapies represent good value in colectomies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1082-1089
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume216
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

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