Costly Labour Adjustment: General Equilibrium Effects of China's Employment Regulations and Financial Reforms

Russell Cooper, Guan Gong, Ping Yan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This article studies the employment and productivity implications of new Chinese labour regulations. We estimate a general equilibrium model of costly labour adjustment from data prior to the policy to study the effects of the interventions. Increases in severance payments are particularly effective and lead to sizable private sector responses. If in place at the time, these frictions would have reduced China's annual growth rate by nearly 1 percentage point between 1998 and 2007, a period of intense privatisation. Credit market liberalisation reduces private firm size and increases private sector employment, labour reallocation, wages and output.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1879-1922
Number of pages44
JournalEconomic Journal
Volume128
Issue number613
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2018

Fingerprint

Financial reform
Labor
Private sector
China
General equilibrium
Employment regulation
Severance payments
General equilibrium model
Productivity
Labor reallocation
Friction
Wages
Labor regulation
Privatization
Market liberalization
Private firms
Firm size
Credit markets

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

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Costly Labour Adjustment : General Equilibrium Effects of China's Employment Regulations and Financial Reforms. / Cooper, Russell; Gong, Guan; Yan, Ping.

In: Economic Journal, Vol. 128, No. 613, 08.2018, p. 1879-1922.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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