CO2 adsorption on crystalline graphitic nanostructures

Mirian Elizabeth Casco, Aarón Morelos-Gómez, Sofia Magdalena Vega-Díaz, Rodolfo Cruz-Silva, Ferdinando Tristán-López, Hiroyuki Muramatsu, Takuya Hayashi, Manuel Martínez-Escandell, Mauricio Terrones Maldonado, Morinobu Endo, Francisco Rodríguez-Reinoso, Joaquín Silvestre-Albero

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

CO2 adsorption has been measured in different types of graphitic nanostructures (MWCNTs, acid treated MWCNTs, graphene nanoribbons and pure graphene) in order to evaluate the effect of the different defective regions/conformations in the adsorption process, i.e., sp3 hybridized carbon, curved regions, edge defects, etc. This analysis has been performed both in pure carbon and nitrogen-doped nanostructures in order to monitor the effect of surface functional groups on surface created after using different treatments (i.e., acid treatment and thermal expansion of the MWCNTs), and study their adsorption properties. Interestingly, the presence of exposed defective regions in the acid treated nanostructures (e.g., uncapped nanotubes) gives rise to an improvement in the amount of CO2 adsorbed; the adsorption process being completely reversible. For N-doped nanostructures, the adsorption capacity is further enhanced when compared to the pure carbon nanotubes after the tubes were unzipped. The larger proportion of defect sites and curved regions together with the presence of stronger adsorbent-adsorbate interactions, through the nitrogen surface groups, explains their larger adsorption capacity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)60-65
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of CO2 Utilization
Volume5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2014

Fingerprint

Nanostructures
Crystalline materials
adsorption
Adsorption
Carbon Nanotubes
Graphite
Graphene
Acids
defect
acid
Nitrogen
Carbon
Nanoribbons
Defects
nitrogen
thermal expansion
carbon
Adsorbates
Adsorbents
Nanotubes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemical Engineering (miscellaneous)
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Process Chemistry and Technology

Cite this

Casco, M. E., Morelos-Gómez, A., Vega-Díaz, S. M., Cruz-Silva, R., Tristán-López, F., Muramatsu, H., ... Silvestre-Albero, J. (2014). CO2 adsorption on crystalline graphitic nanostructures. Journal of CO2 Utilization, 5, 60-65. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcou.2014.01.001
Casco, Mirian Elizabeth ; Morelos-Gómez, Aarón ; Vega-Díaz, Sofia Magdalena ; Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo ; Tristán-López, Ferdinando ; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki ; Hayashi, Takuya ; Martínez-Escandell, Manuel ; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio ; Endo, Morinobu ; Rodríguez-Reinoso, Francisco ; Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín. / CO2 adsorption on crystalline graphitic nanostructures. In: Journal of CO2 Utilization. 2014 ; Vol. 5. pp. 60-65.
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Casco, ME, Morelos-Gómez, A, Vega-Díaz, SM, Cruz-Silva, R, Tristán-López, F, Muramatsu, H, Hayashi, T, Martínez-Escandell, M, Terrones Maldonado, M, Endo, M, Rodríguez-Reinoso, F & Silvestre-Albero, J 2014, 'CO2 adsorption on crystalline graphitic nanostructures', Journal of CO2 Utilization, vol. 5, pp. 60-65. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcou.2014.01.001

CO2 adsorption on crystalline graphitic nanostructures. / Casco, Mirian Elizabeth; Morelos-Gómez, Aarón; Vega-Díaz, Sofia Magdalena; Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo; Tristán-López, Ferdinando; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Takuya; Martínez-Escandell, Manuel; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio; Endo, Morinobu; Rodríguez-Reinoso, Francisco; Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín.

In: Journal of CO2 Utilization, Vol. 5, 01.03.2014, p. 60-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - CO2 adsorption on crystalline graphitic nanostructures

AU - Casco, Mirian Elizabeth

AU - Morelos-Gómez, Aarón

AU - Vega-Díaz, Sofia Magdalena

AU - Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo

AU - Tristán-López, Ferdinando

AU - Muramatsu, Hiroyuki

AU - Hayashi, Takuya

AU - Martínez-Escandell, Manuel

AU - Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio

AU - Endo, Morinobu

AU - Rodríguez-Reinoso, Francisco

AU - Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín

PY - 2014/3/1

Y1 - 2014/3/1

N2 - CO2 adsorption has been measured in different types of graphitic nanostructures (MWCNTs, acid treated MWCNTs, graphene nanoribbons and pure graphene) in order to evaluate the effect of the different defective regions/conformations in the adsorption process, i.e., sp3 hybridized carbon, curved regions, edge defects, etc. This analysis has been performed both in pure carbon and nitrogen-doped nanostructures in order to monitor the effect of surface functional groups on surface created after using different treatments (i.e., acid treatment and thermal expansion of the MWCNTs), and study their adsorption properties. Interestingly, the presence of exposed defective regions in the acid treated nanostructures (e.g., uncapped nanotubes) gives rise to an improvement in the amount of CO2 adsorbed; the adsorption process being completely reversible. For N-doped nanostructures, the adsorption capacity is further enhanced when compared to the pure carbon nanotubes after the tubes were unzipped. The larger proportion of defect sites and curved regions together with the presence of stronger adsorbent-adsorbate interactions, through the nitrogen surface groups, explains their larger adsorption capacity.

AB - CO2 adsorption has been measured in different types of graphitic nanostructures (MWCNTs, acid treated MWCNTs, graphene nanoribbons and pure graphene) in order to evaluate the effect of the different defective regions/conformations in the adsorption process, i.e., sp3 hybridized carbon, curved regions, edge defects, etc. This analysis has been performed both in pure carbon and nitrogen-doped nanostructures in order to monitor the effect of surface functional groups on surface created after using different treatments (i.e., acid treatment and thermal expansion of the MWCNTs), and study their adsorption properties. Interestingly, the presence of exposed defective regions in the acid treated nanostructures (e.g., uncapped nanotubes) gives rise to an improvement in the amount of CO2 adsorbed; the adsorption process being completely reversible. For N-doped nanostructures, the adsorption capacity is further enhanced when compared to the pure carbon nanotubes after the tubes were unzipped. The larger proportion of defect sites and curved regions together with the presence of stronger adsorbent-adsorbate interactions, through the nitrogen surface groups, explains their larger adsorption capacity.

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Casco ME, Morelos-Gómez A, Vega-Díaz SM, Cruz-Silva R, Tristán-López F, Muramatsu H et al. CO2 adsorption on crystalline graphitic nanostructures. Journal of CO2 Utilization. 2014 Mar 1;5:60-65. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcou.2014.01.001