Counter-science

African american historians and the critique of ethnology in nineteenth-century america

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The intersections between social and scientific definitions of race were never so con-spicious nor so consequential as in the nineteenth century. And never was this more true than when such definitions were made to apply to African Americans. We have a scholarship of considerable depth detailing the ways in which African Americans were subjected to the terms of racial science; we need now to ask how those terms were resisted, by whom, and through which rhetorical resources. This essay examines how postbellum African American historians contested racial science and constructed a rhetoric of vindication by appropriating certain scientific claims even as they asserted extra-scientific grounds for full citizenship rights.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)268-284
Number of pages17
JournalWestern Journal of Communication
Volume64
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2000

Fingerprint

ethnology
historian
nineteenth century
science
rhetoric
citizenship
resources
American
African Americans
Historian
Ethnology
Rhetoric
Racial Science

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics

Cite this

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