Court-ordered finance reforms in the adequacy ERA: Heterogeneous causal effects and sensitivity

Christopher A. Candelaria, Kenneth A. Shores

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

We provide new evidence about the effect of court-ordered finance reforms that took place between 1989 and 2010 on per-pupil revenues and graduation rates. We account for heterogeneity in the treated and counterfactual groups to estimate the effect of overturning a state’s finance system. Seven years after reform, the highest poverty quartile in a treated state experienced an 11.5 percent to 12.1 percent increase in per-pupil spending, and a 6.8 to 11.5 percentage point increase in graduation rates. We subject the model to various sensitivity tests, which provide upper and lower bounds on the estimates. Estimates range, in most cases, from 6 to 12 percentage points for graduation rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-60
Number of pages30
JournalEducation Finance and Policy
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Court-ordered finance reforms in the adequacy ERA: Heterogeneous causal effects and sensitivity'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this