Cover crop species and cultivars for drill-interseeding in mid-atlantic corn and soybean

Katherine Caswell, John Wallace, William S. Curran, Steven B. Mirsky, Matt R. Ryan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Drill-interseeding is becoming a viable method for integrating cover crops in no-till corn (Zea mays L.) production in the Mid-Atlantic region. Development of best management practices for drill-interseeding cover crops into no-till grain crops requires greater understanding of cover crop performance at the species and cultivar level. Experiments were conducted at multiple Mid-Atlantic locations (Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York) in two consecutive growing seasons (2013–2014, 2014–2015) to evaluate establishment and performance of drill-interseeded: (i) grass and legume cover crop species (n = 8) and annual ryegrass [Lolium perenne L. spp. multiflorum (Lam.) Husnot] cultivars (n = 10) in field corn, and (ii) grass and legume cover crop species (n = 6) in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr]. Fall biomass production of drill-interseeded cover crops was higher and less variable among locations in field corn than soybean. Annual ryegrass, orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.), medium red clover (Trifolium pratense L.), and crimson clover (Trifolium incarntum L.) produced greater mean fall biomass than other species in field corn, but variable winter hardiness of crimson clover resulted in less spring biomass than alternative species. No differences were observed among annual ryegrass cultivars. Annual ryegrass, medium red clover, and crimson clover produced greater mean fall biomass than other species in soybean across locations. Our results highlight the viability of a narrow suite of cover crop species for interseeding in Mid-Atlantic no-till grain systems and point to the need for development of agronomic practices that facilitate greater niche complementarity between cover and cash crops.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1060-1067
Number of pages8
JournalAgronomy Journal
Volume111
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

Fingerprint

cover crops
soybeans
corn
cultivars
Trifolium incarnatum
Lolium
Trifolium pratense
no-tillage
Dactylis glomerata
biomass
legumes
Mid-Atlantic region
grasses
winter hardiness
Trifolium
cash crops
best management practices
plant cultural practices
grain crops
Lolium perenne

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Cite this

Caswell, Katherine ; Wallace, John ; Curran, William S. ; Mirsky, Steven B. ; Ryan, Matt R. / Cover crop species and cultivars for drill-interseeding in mid-atlantic corn and soybean. In: Agronomy Journal. 2019 ; Vol. 111, No. 3. pp. 1060-1067.
@article{f6f5537d005b4986948466db7e398d3d,
title = "Cover crop species and cultivars for drill-interseeding in mid-atlantic corn and soybean",
abstract = "Drill-interseeding is becoming a viable method for integrating cover crops in no-till corn (Zea mays L.) production in the Mid-Atlantic region. Development of best management practices for drill-interseeding cover crops into no-till grain crops requires greater understanding of cover crop performance at the species and cultivar level. Experiments were conducted at multiple Mid-Atlantic locations (Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York) in two consecutive growing seasons (2013–2014, 2014–2015) to evaluate establishment and performance of drill-interseeded: (i) grass and legume cover crop species (n = 8) and annual ryegrass [Lolium perenne L. spp. multiflorum (Lam.) Husnot] cultivars (n = 10) in field corn, and (ii) grass and legume cover crop species (n = 6) in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr]. Fall biomass production of drill-interseeded cover crops was higher and less variable among locations in field corn than soybean. Annual ryegrass, orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.), medium red clover (Trifolium pratense L.), and crimson clover (Trifolium incarntum L.) produced greater mean fall biomass than other species in field corn, but variable winter hardiness of crimson clover resulted in less spring biomass than alternative species. No differences were observed among annual ryegrass cultivars. Annual ryegrass, medium red clover, and crimson clover produced greater mean fall biomass than other species in soybean across locations. Our results highlight the viability of a narrow suite of cover crop species for interseeding in Mid-Atlantic no-till grain systems and point to the need for development of agronomic practices that facilitate greater niche complementarity between cover and cash crops.",
author = "Katherine Caswell and John Wallace and Curran, {William S.} and Mirsky, {Steven B.} and Ryan, {Matt R.}",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2134/agronj2018.08.0511",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "111",
pages = "1060--1067",
journal = "Agronomy Journal",
issn = "0002-1962",
publisher = "American Society of Agronomy",
number = "3",

}

Cover crop species and cultivars for drill-interseeding in mid-atlantic corn and soybean. / Caswell, Katherine; Wallace, John; Curran, William S.; Mirsky, Steven B.; Ryan, Matt R.

In: Agronomy Journal, Vol. 111, No. 3, 01.05.2019, p. 1060-1067.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cover crop species and cultivars for drill-interseeding in mid-atlantic corn and soybean

AU - Caswell, Katherine

AU - Wallace, John

AU - Curran, William S.

AU - Mirsky, Steven B.

AU - Ryan, Matt R.

PY - 2019/5/1

Y1 - 2019/5/1

N2 - Drill-interseeding is becoming a viable method for integrating cover crops in no-till corn (Zea mays L.) production in the Mid-Atlantic region. Development of best management practices for drill-interseeding cover crops into no-till grain crops requires greater understanding of cover crop performance at the species and cultivar level. Experiments were conducted at multiple Mid-Atlantic locations (Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York) in two consecutive growing seasons (2013–2014, 2014–2015) to evaluate establishment and performance of drill-interseeded: (i) grass and legume cover crop species (n = 8) and annual ryegrass [Lolium perenne L. spp. multiflorum (Lam.) Husnot] cultivars (n = 10) in field corn, and (ii) grass and legume cover crop species (n = 6) in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr]. Fall biomass production of drill-interseeded cover crops was higher and less variable among locations in field corn than soybean. Annual ryegrass, orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.), medium red clover (Trifolium pratense L.), and crimson clover (Trifolium incarntum L.) produced greater mean fall biomass than other species in field corn, but variable winter hardiness of crimson clover resulted in less spring biomass than alternative species. No differences were observed among annual ryegrass cultivars. Annual ryegrass, medium red clover, and crimson clover produced greater mean fall biomass than other species in soybean across locations. Our results highlight the viability of a narrow suite of cover crop species for interseeding in Mid-Atlantic no-till grain systems and point to the need for development of agronomic practices that facilitate greater niche complementarity between cover and cash crops.

AB - Drill-interseeding is becoming a viable method for integrating cover crops in no-till corn (Zea mays L.) production in the Mid-Atlantic region. Development of best management practices for drill-interseeding cover crops into no-till grain crops requires greater understanding of cover crop performance at the species and cultivar level. Experiments were conducted at multiple Mid-Atlantic locations (Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York) in two consecutive growing seasons (2013–2014, 2014–2015) to evaluate establishment and performance of drill-interseeded: (i) grass and legume cover crop species (n = 8) and annual ryegrass [Lolium perenne L. spp. multiflorum (Lam.) Husnot] cultivars (n = 10) in field corn, and (ii) grass and legume cover crop species (n = 6) in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr]. Fall biomass production of drill-interseeded cover crops was higher and less variable among locations in field corn than soybean. Annual ryegrass, orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.), medium red clover (Trifolium pratense L.), and crimson clover (Trifolium incarntum L.) produced greater mean fall biomass than other species in field corn, but variable winter hardiness of crimson clover resulted in less spring biomass than alternative species. No differences were observed among annual ryegrass cultivars. Annual ryegrass, medium red clover, and crimson clover produced greater mean fall biomass than other species in soybean across locations. Our results highlight the viability of a narrow suite of cover crop species for interseeding in Mid-Atlantic no-till grain systems and point to the need for development of agronomic practices that facilitate greater niche complementarity between cover and cash crops.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85066613023&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85066613023&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2134/agronj2018.08.0511

DO - 10.2134/agronj2018.08.0511

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85066613023

VL - 111

SP - 1060

EP - 1067

JO - Agronomy Journal

JF - Agronomy Journal

SN - 0002-1962

IS - 3

ER -