Creativity for Deliberate Harm: Malevolent Creativity and Social Information Processing Theory

Melissa B. Gutworth, Lily Cushenbery, Samuel Todd Hunter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Both popular press and academic research laud the benefits of creativity. Malevolent creativity, however, is the application of creativity to intentionally harm others. This study examines predictors of malevolent creativity, considering both contextual and individual difference influences. Social information processing theory suggests that situational cues might be more influential in shaping malevolent creativity. Two experimental laboratory studies test the effects of both formal and informal situational cues and find that these factors are predictive of malevolent creativity components above and beyond individual differences such as personality and cognitive ability. Implications of these findings for research and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)305-322
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Creative Behavior
Volume52
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

Fingerprint

Information Theory
Creativity
Automatic Data Processing
information processing
creativity
Individuality
Cues
popular press
Aptitude
cognitive ability
Research
Personality
Harm
Social Information Processing
personality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts

Cite this

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Creativity for Deliberate Harm : Malevolent Creativity and Social Information Processing Theory. / Gutworth, Melissa B.; Cushenbery, Lily; Hunter, Samuel Todd.

In: Journal of Creative Behavior, Vol. 52, No. 4, 01.12.2018, p. 305-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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