Crisis theory/practice: Towards a sustainable future

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

106 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We are living in a world rife with many types of crises. The most prominent and urgent crises involve the earth's ecology. Environmental crises involving Ozone depletion, global warming, toxic and radioactive wastes, air pollution, industrial accidents etc. are affecting communities around the world. In this paper, I examine changes in crisis management theory and practice. In the past two decades, much progress has been made in our understanding of industrial and environmental crises. However, our understanding remains highly fragmented and selective. We need to integrate diverse findings and cumulatively build on past knowledge. To do this the concept of “sustainable development” provides a unifying motif. Some research questions that deserve urgent attention are identified.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-42
Number of pages20
JournalOrganization & Environment
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1993

Fingerprint

crisis management
ozone depletion
radioactive waste
accident
global warming
sustainable development
atmospheric pollution
ecology
world
Practice theory
waste air
toxic waste
Depletion
Ozone
Crisis management
Sustainable development
Management theory
Air pollution
Management practices
Industrial accidents

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Cite this

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Crisis theory/practice : Towards a sustainable future. / Shrivastava, Paul.

In: Organization & Environment, Vol. 7, No. 1, 03.1993, p. 23-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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