Criterion validity and the utility of reactive and proactive aggression: comparisons to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, and other measures of functioning.

D. A. Waschbusch, M. T. Willoughby, W. E. Pelham

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111 Scopus citations

Abstract

Examined the criterion validity and the utility of Dodge and Coie's (1987) measure of reactive and proactive aggression. Participants were 405 children in kindergarten through 5th grade attending an urban elementary school. Examined criterion validity by testing whether reactive aggression or proactive aggression was significantly correlated with criterion measures of overall impairment as measured by the Impairment Rating Scale (Pelham, Gnagy, et al., 1996), classroom behavior as measured by a frequency count of classroom rule violations, and peer adjustment as measured by teacher ratings of peer behavior on the Pittsburgh Modified IOWA Conners (Pelham, Milich, Murphy, & Murphy, 1989). Examined utility by testing whether reactive aggression or proactive aggression was significantly correlated with criterion measures after controlling for each other and after controlling for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder as measured by the Disruptive Behavior Disorder Rating Scales (Pelham, Gnagy, Greenslade, & Milich, 1992). Results showed good evidence of criterion validity for both reactive and proactive aggression, but mixed evidence for their utility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)396-405
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of clinical child psychology
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1998

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

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