Cross-functional project teams in construction: A longitudinal case study

Jean E. Laurent, Robert Michael Leicht

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

For many years traditional project delivery methods have been utilized in the construction industry, but new delivery systems such as IPD are being developed to answer the need for more integrated approaches. Studies have been conducted to assess the impact of project delivery method on project performance, but few focus on the effect of team composition and organization. However, many factors influence the need for evolving cross-functional project teams (CFPTs) as project needs change and there are additions of new participants to the project. This research presents a case study of an IPD project delivered at the Pennsylvania State University for a mixed-use laboratory, office and classroom building. The objective is to demonstrate the composition and evolution of the CFPTs organization, from the beginning of the design through early construction. This study shows that three main causes impacted the organization of CFPTs. First, the on-boarding of new project participants necessitated new CFPT organization to better fit members into specific groups. Second, certain CFPTs were created in order to achieve a specific task, leading to the dissolution of the team once the task is achieved. Third, CFPTs can show low performance related to their original goals requiring the project team to adjust the CFPT organization. The IPD structure showed unique organizational flexibility as CFPTs, leaders and members were replaced or exchanged to better fit the project needs when new members are added to the team, or if a member was not effective in meeting changing project needs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages317-324
Number of pages8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
Event25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction, IGLC 2017 - Hersonissos, Crete, Greece
Duration: Jul 9 2017Jul 12 2017

Other

Other25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction, IGLC 2017
CountryGreece
CityHersonissos, Crete
Period7/9/177/12/17

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Construction industry
Chemical analysis
Dissolution

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction

Cite this

Laurent, J. E., & Leicht, R. M. (2017). Cross-functional project teams in construction: A longitudinal case study. 317-324. Paper presented at 25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction, IGLC 2017, Hersonissos, Crete, Greece. https://doi.org/10.24928/2017/0063
Laurent, Jean E. ; Leicht, Robert Michael. / Cross-functional project teams in construction : A longitudinal case study. Paper presented at 25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction, IGLC 2017, Hersonissos, Crete, Greece.8 p.
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Laurent, JE & Leicht, RM 2017, 'Cross-functional project teams in construction: A longitudinal case study', Paper presented at 25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction, IGLC 2017, Hersonissos, Crete, Greece, 7/9/17 - 7/12/17 pp. 317-324. https://doi.org/10.24928/2017/0063

Cross-functional project teams in construction : A longitudinal case study. / Laurent, Jean E.; Leicht, Robert Michael.

2017. 317-324 Paper presented at 25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction, IGLC 2017, Hersonissos, Crete, Greece.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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Laurent JE, Leicht RM. Cross-functional project teams in construction: A longitudinal case study. 2017. Paper presented at 25th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction, IGLC 2017, Hersonissos, Crete, Greece. https://doi.org/10.24928/2017/0063