Crypto War II

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Revelations about the National Security Agency (NSA) and other intelligence agencies' widespread surveillance in the summer of 2013 have accelerated America's path toward a second critical battle over public cryptography. Because so much more of our society is now online, Crypto War II will be a far more devastating conflagration than the Crypto War of the 1990s-one that pits our fundamental right to control the computers and smart devices that are becoming an everyday part of our lives against a combination of corporate and government interests. While the Summer of Snowden has received widespread media coverage, the potential alignment of private and public sector surveillance interests pose a far greater threat to free communication in the 21st century than we've yet realized.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-128
Number of pages6
JournalCritical Studies in Media Communication
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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National security
Cryptography
surveillance
fundamental right
Communication
national security
private sector
public sector
coverage
threat
communication
Society

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication

Cite this

Meinrath, Sascha Dero ; Vitka, Sean. / Crypto War II. In: Critical Studies in Media Communication. 2014 ; Vol. 31, No. 2. pp. 123-128.
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Crypto War II. / Meinrath, Sascha Dero; Vitka, Sean.

In: Critical Studies in Media Communication, Vol. 31, No. 2, 01.01.2014, p. 123-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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