CUES‐PAUSE‐POINT LANGUAGE TRAINING: TEACHING ECHOLALICS FUNCTIONAL USE OF THEIR VERBAL LABELING REPERTOIRES

Martin J. McMorrow, R. M. Foxx, Gerald D. Faw, Ron G. Bittle

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20 Scopus citations

Abstract

We evaluated the direct and generalized effects of cues‐pause‐point language training procedures on immediate echolalia and correct responding in two severely retarded females. Two experiments were conducted with each subject in which the overall goal was to encourage them to remain quiet before, during, and briefly after the presentation of questions and then to verbalize on the basis of environmental cues whose labels represented the correct responses. Multiple baseline designs across question/response pairs (Experiment I) or question/response pairs and settings (Experiment II) demonstrated that echolalia was rapidly replaced by correct responding on the trained stimuli. More importantly, there were clear improvements in subjects' responding to untrained stimuli. Results demonstrated that the cues‐pause‐point procedures can be effective in teaching severely retarded or echolalic individuals functional use of their verbal labeling repertoires. 1987 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11-22
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of applied behavior analysis
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1987

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Philosophy
  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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