Cyber Victimization and Perceived Stress: Linkages to Late Adolescents’ Cyber Aggression and Psychological Functioning

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11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study examined multiple sources of strain, particular cyber victimization, and perceived stress from parents, peers, and academics, in relation to late adolescents’ (ages 16-18; N = 423) cyber aggression, anxiety, and depression, each assessed 1 year later (Time 2). Three-way interactions revealed that the relationship between Time 1 cyber victimization and later depression was more positive when adolescents experienced high perceived stress (i.e., parents, peers, academics) and engaged in high cyber aggression. However, Time 2 anxiety and Time 1 cyber victimization were more strongly associated at higher levels of Time 1 perceived peer stress such that cyber aggression did not have the same joint role in these associations as it did with depression. These findings indicate that dual sources of strain combined with aggressive behaviors might negatively affect adolescents’ well-being, particularly their depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)789-810
Number of pages22
JournalYouth and Society
Volume47
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

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victimization
aggression
adolescent
parents
anxiety
aggressive behavior
well-being
time
interaction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "The present study examined multiple sources of strain, particular cyber victimization, and perceived stress from parents, peers, and academics, in relation to late adolescents’ (ages 16-18; N = 423) cyber aggression, anxiety, and depression, each assessed 1 year later (Time 2). Three-way interactions revealed that the relationship between Time 1 cyber victimization and later depression was more positive when adolescents experienced high perceived stress (i.e., parents, peers, academics) and engaged in high cyber aggression. However, Time 2 anxiety and Time 1 cyber victimization were more strongly associated at higher levels of Time 1 perceived peer stress such that cyber aggression did not have the same joint role in these associations as it did with depression. These findings indicate that dual sources of strain combined with aggressive behaviors might negatively affect adolescents’ well-being, particularly their depression.",
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