Cyberculture in the large: World house

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This essay describes a gesture of thought and politics—almost ahistorically called “cyberculture”—that appeared in the early 1960s and extended its reach into the politics and poetry that followed. To reread this gesture, I explain, brings new terms of legibility to this later work, from Marshall McLuhan to W.S. Merwin and Philip José Farmer to Shulamith Firestone and Martin Luther King Jr. It may also enable a point of resistance to advancing technological orders of global capitalism. This is our chance—“our” meaning all of humanity, not only a few who are exceptionally fortunate—to. . . do our human work, to live human lives, to devote ourselves. . . to poetry and politics. —Alice Mary Hilton, The Conference on the Cybercultural Revolution (1964).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-206
Number of pages28
JournalConfigurations
Volume26
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Poetry
Gestures
Politics
poetry
Capitalism
politics
capitalist society
farmer
Gesture
carbosulfan
Farmers
Human Life
1960s
Marshall McLuhan
Legibility
Global Capitalism
Martin Luther King
Thought
Revolution

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Philosophy
  • Literature and Literary Theory

Cite this

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Cyberculture in the large : World house. / Tierney, Matthew Allen.

In: Configurations, Vol. 26, No. 2, 01.01.2018, p. 179-206.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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