Cycles and trends in cod populations

Ottar N. Bjornstad, Jean Marc Fromentin, Nils Chr Stenseth, Jakob Gjøaæter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

121 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Year-to-year fluctuations in fish stocks are usually attributed to variability in recruitment, competition, predation, and changes in catchability. Trends in abundance, in contrast, are usually ascribed to human exploitation and large-scale environmental changes. In this study, we demonstrate, through statistical modeling of survey data (19211994) of cod from the Norwegian Skagerrak coast, that both short- and long-term variability may arise from the same set of age-structured interactions. Asymmetric competition and cannibalism between cohorts generate alternating years of high and low abundance. Intercohort interactions also resonate the recruitment variability so that long-term trends are induced. The coupling of age-structure and variable recruitment should, therefore, be considered when explaining both the short- and long-term fluctuations displayed by the coastal cod populations. Resonant effects may occur in many marine populations that exhibit this combination of traits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5066-5071
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume96
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 27 1999

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Gadiformes
Cannibalism
Population
Fishes
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Bjornstad, Ottar N. ; Fromentin, Jean Marc ; Stenseth, Nils Chr ; Gjøaæter, Jakob. / Cycles and trends in cod populations. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 1999 ; Vol. 96, No. 9. pp. 5066-5071.
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Cycles and trends in cod populations. / Bjornstad, Ottar N.; Fromentin, Jean Marc; Stenseth, Nils Chr; Gjøaæter, Jakob.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 96, No. 9, 27.04.1999, p. 5066-5071.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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