Daily shame and hostile irritability in adolescent girls with borderline personality disorder symptoms

Lori N. Scott, Stephanie D. Stepp, Michael N. Hallquist, Diana J. Whalen, Aidan G.C. Wright, Paul A. Pilkonis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent theoretical and empirical work suggests that adults with borderline personality disorder (BPD) have difficulty regulating both shame and anger, and that these emotions may be functionally related in clinically relevant ways (e.g., Schoenleber & Berenbaum, 2012b). The covariation of shame with anger-related emotions has important clinical implications for interventions targeting shame and uncontrolled anger in BPD. However, no studies have examined shame, anger, and their covariation in adolescents who may be at risk for developing BPD. Therefore, this study focuses on associations between BPD symptoms and patterns of covariation between daily experiences of shame and anger-related affects (i.e., hostile irritability) in a community sample of adolescent girls using ecological momentary assessment. Multilevel models revealed that girls with greater BPD symptoms who reported greater mean levels of shame across the week also tended to report more hostile irritability, even after controlling for guilt. Additionally, examination of within-person variability showed that girls with greater BPD symptoms reported more hostile irritability on occasions when they also reported greater concurrent shame, but this was only the case in girls of average socioeconomic status (i.e., those not receiving public assistance). Unlike shame, guilt was not associated with hostile irritability in girls with greater BPD symptoms. Results suggest that shame may be a key clinical target in the treatment of anger-related difficulties among adolescent girls with BPD symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-63
Number of pages11
JournalPersonality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Shame
Borderline Personality Disorder
Anger
Guilt
Emotions
Public Assistance
Social Class

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Scott, Lori N. ; Stepp, Stephanie D. ; Hallquist, Michael N. ; Whalen, Diana J. ; Wright, Aidan G.C. ; Pilkonis, Paul A. / Daily shame and hostile irritability in adolescent girls with borderline personality disorder symptoms. In: Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment. 2015 ; Vol. 6, No. 1. pp. 53-63.
@article{add9358c3d4249c28d35e3b514b6a0e5,
title = "Daily shame and hostile irritability in adolescent girls with borderline personality disorder symptoms",
abstract = "Recent theoretical and empirical work suggests that adults with borderline personality disorder (BPD) have difficulty regulating both shame and anger, and that these emotions may be functionally related in clinically relevant ways (e.g., Schoenleber & Berenbaum, 2012b). The covariation of shame with anger-related emotions has important clinical implications for interventions targeting shame and uncontrolled anger in BPD. However, no studies have examined shame, anger, and their covariation in adolescents who may be at risk for developing BPD. Therefore, this study focuses on associations between BPD symptoms and patterns of covariation between daily experiences of shame and anger-related affects (i.e., hostile irritability) in a community sample of adolescent girls using ecological momentary assessment. Multilevel models revealed that girls with greater BPD symptoms who reported greater mean levels of shame across the week also tended to report more hostile irritability, even after controlling for guilt. Additionally, examination of within-person variability showed that girls with greater BPD symptoms reported more hostile irritability on occasions when they also reported greater concurrent shame, but this was only the case in girls of average socioeconomic status (i.e., those not receiving public assistance). Unlike shame, guilt was not associated with hostile irritability in girls with greater BPD symptoms. Results suggest that shame may be a key clinical target in the treatment of anger-related difficulties among adolescent girls with BPD symptoms.",
author = "Scott, {Lori N.} and Stepp, {Stephanie D.} and Hallquist, {Michael N.} and Whalen, {Diana J.} and Wright, {Aidan G.C.} and Pilkonis, {Paul A.}",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1037/per0000107",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "53--63",
journal = "Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment",
issn = "1949-2715",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "1",

}

Daily shame and hostile irritability in adolescent girls with borderline personality disorder symptoms. / Scott, Lori N.; Stepp, Stephanie D.; Hallquist, Michael N.; Whalen, Diana J.; Wright, Aidan G.C.; Pilkonis, Paul A.

In: Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment, Vol. 6, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 53-63.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Daily shame and hostile irritability in adolescent girls with borderline personality disorder symptoms

AU - Scott, Lori N.

AU - Stepp, Stephanie D.

AU - Hallquist, Michael N.

AU - Whalen, Diana J.

AU - Wright, Aidan G.C.

AU - Pilkonis, Paul A.

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Recent theoretical and empirical work suggests that adults with borderline personality disorder (BPD) have difficulty regulating both shame and anger, and that these emotions may be functionally related in clinically relevant ways (e.g., Schoenleber & Berenbaum, 2012b). The covariation of shame with anger-related emotions has important clinical implications for interventions targeting shame and uncontrolled anger in BPD. However, no studies have examined shame, anger, and their covariation in adolescents who may be at risk for developing BPD. Therefore, this study focuses on associations between BPD symptoms and patterns of covariation between daily experiences of shame and anger-related affects (i.e., hostile irritability) in a community sample of adolescent girls using ecological momentary assessment. Multilevel models revealed that girls with greater BPD symptoms who reported greater mean levels of shame across the week also tended to report more hostile irritability, even after controlling for guilt. Additionally, examination of within-person variability showed that girls with greater BPD symptoms reported more hostile irritability on occasions when they also reported greater concurrent shame, but this was only the case in girls of average socioeconomic status (i.e., those not receiving public assistance). Unlike shame, guilt was not associated with hostile irritability in girls with greater BPD symptoms. Results suggest that shame may be a key clinical target in the treatment of anger-related difficulties among adolescent girls with BPD symptoms.

AB - Recent theoretical and empirical work suggests that adults with borderline personality disorder (BPD) have difficulty regulating both shame and anger, and that these emotions may be functionally related in clinically relevant ways (e.g., Schoenleber & Berenbaum, 2012b). The covariation of shame with anger-related emotions has important clinical implications for interventions targeting shame and uncontrolled anger in BPD. However, no studies have examined shame, anger, and their covariation in adolescents who may be at risk for developing BPD. Therefore, this study focuses on associations between BPD symptoms and patterns of covariation between daily experiences of shame and anger-related affects (i.e., hostile irritability) in a community sample of adolescent girls using ecological momentary assessment. Multilevel models revealed that girls with greater BPD symptoms who reported greater mean levels of shame across the week also tended to report more hostile irritability, even after controlling for guilt. Additionally, examination of within-person variability showed that girls with greater BPD symptoms reported more hostile irritability on occasions when they also reported greater concurrent shame, but this was only the case in girls of average socioeconomic status (i.e., those not receiving public assistance). Unlike shame, guilt was not associated with hostile irritability in girls with greater BPD symptoms. Results suggest that shame may be a key clinical target in the treatment of anger-related difficulties among adolescent girls with BPD symptoms.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84937782856&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84937782856&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/per0000107

DO - 10.1037/per0000107

M3 - Article

C2 - 25580673

AN - SCOPUS:84937782856

VL - 6

SP - 53

EP - 63

JO - Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment

JF - Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment

SN - 1949-2715

IS - 1

ER -