Damage and management of Meloidogyne hapla using oxamyl on carrot in New York

Beth Krueger Gugino, G. S. Abawi, J. W. Ludwig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The northern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla) is a major pathogen of processing carrot in New York, significantly reducing marketable yield and profitability. Severely infected carrots are stubby, galled and forked and therefore unmarketable. In field microplot trials in 1996 and 1998, the incidence and severity of root-galling increased and the marketable yield of carrot decreased as the initial inoculum density of M. hapla was increased from 0 to 8 eggs/cm3 soil, in mineral or organic soils. The application of oxamyl at planting was effective against M. hapla and its damage to carrots grown in mineral and organic soils. Oxamyl application reduced root-galling severity and increased marketable yield. In commercial fields, the cost-effectiveness of oxamyl application was related to the level of soil infestation with M. hapla.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)483-490
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nematology
Volume38
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 2006

Fingerprint

oxamyl
Meloidogyne hapla
carrots
organic soils
mineral soils
inoculum density
cost effectiveness
root-knot nematodes
profitability
field experimentation
planting
incidence
pathogens
soil

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

@article{d16e12675ad949fead0447e6720304f7,
title = "Damage and management of Meloidogyne hapla using oxamyl on carrot in New York",
abstract = "The northern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla) is a major pathogen of processing carrot in New York, significantly reducing marketable yield and profitability. Severely infected carrots are stubby, galled and forked and therefore unmarketable. In field microplot trials in 1996 and 1998, the incidence and severity of root-galling increased and the marketable yield of carrot decreased as the initial inoculum density of M. hapla was increased from 0 to 8 eggs/cm3 soil, in mineral or organic soils. The application of oxamyl at planting was effective against M. hapla and its damage to carrots grown in mineral and organic soils. Oxamyl application reduced root-galling severity and increased marketable yield. In commercial fields, the cost-effectiveness of oxamyl application was related to the level of soil infestation with M. hapla.",
author = "Gugino, {Beth Krueger} and Abawi, {G. S.} and Ludwig, {J. W.}",
year = "2006",
month = "12",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "38",
pages = "483--490",
journal = "Journal of Nematology",
issn = "0022-300X",
publisher = "Society of Nematologists",
number = "4",

}

Damage and management of Meloidogyne hapla using oxamyl on carrot in New York. / Gugino, Beth Krueger; Abawi, G. S.; Ludwig, J. W.

In: Journal of Nematology, Vol. 38, No. 4, 12.2006, p. 483-490.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Damage and management of Meloidogyne hapla using oxamyl on carrot in New York

AU - Gugino, Beth Krueger

AU - Abawi, G. S.

AU - Ludwig, J. W.

PY - 2006/12

Y1 - 2006/12

N2 - The northern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla) is a major pathogen of processing carrot in New York, significantly reducing marketable yield and profitability. Severely infected carrots are stubby, galled and forked and therefore unmarketable. In field microplot trials in 1996 and 1998, the incidence and severity of root-galling increased and the marketable yield of carrot decreased as the initial inoculum density of M. hapla was increased from 0 to 8 eggs/cm3 soil, in mineral or organic soils. The application of oxamyl at planting was effective against M. hapla and its damage to carrots grown in mineral and organic soils. Oxamyl application reduced root-galling severity and increased marketable yield. In commercial fields, the cost-effectiveness of oxamyl application was related to the level of soil infestation with M. hapla.

AB - The northern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla) is a major pathogen of processing carrot in New York, significantly reducing marketable yield and profitability. Severely infected carrots are stubby, galled and forked and therefore unmarketable. In field microplot trials in 1996 and 1998, the incidence and severity of root-galling increased and the marketable yield of carrot decreased as the initial inoculum density of M. hapla was increased from 0 to 8 eggs/cm3 soil, in mineral or organic soils. The application of oxamyl at planting was effective against M. hapla and its damage to carrots grown in mineral and organic soils. Oxamyl application reduced root-galling severity and increased marketable yield. In commercial fields, the cost-effectiveness of oxamyl application was related to the level of soil infestation with M. hapla.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34147108652&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34147108652&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 38

SP - 483

EP - 490

JO - Journal of Nematology

JF - Journal of Nematology

SN - 0022-300X

IS - 4

ER -