Daytime napping, nighttime sleeping, and parkinson disease

Jianjun Gao, Xuemei Huang, Yikyung Park, Albert Hollenbeck, Aaron Blair, Arthur Schatzkin, Honglei Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Preliminary evidence suggests that daytime sleepiness may predate clinical diagnosis of Parkinson disease. The authors examined daytime napping and nighttime sleeping durations, reported in 1996-1997 by 220,934 US NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study participants, in relation to Parkinson disease diagnoses at 3 clinical stages: established (cases diagnosed before 1995, n = 267), recent (1995-1999, n = 396), and prediagnostic (2000 and after, n = 770). Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were derived from multivariate logistic regression models. Longer daytime napping was associated with higher odds of Parkinson disease at all 3 clinical stages: the odds ratios comparing long nappers (>1 hour/day) with nonnappers were 3.9 (95% confidence interval: 2.8, 5.6) for established cases, 2.2 (95% confidence interval: 1.7, 3.0) for recent cases, and 1.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.2, 1.9) for prediagnostic cases. Further control for health status or nighttime sleeping duration attenuated the association for established cases but made little difference for recent or prediagnostic cases. In the nighttime sleeping analysis, a clear U-shaped association with Parkinson disease was observed for established cases; however, this association was attenuated markedly for recent cases and disappeared for prediagnostic cases. This study supports the notion that daytime sleepiness, but not nighttime sleeping duration, is one of the early nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1032-1038
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of epidemiology
Volume173
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2011

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Parkinson Disease
Confidence Intervals
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Prednisolone
Health Status
Diet
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Gao, J., Huang, X., Park, Y., Hollenbeck, A., Blair, A., Schatzkin, A., & Chen, H. (2011). Daytime napping, nighttime sleeping, and parkinson disease. American journal of epidemiology, 173(9), 1032-1038. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwq478
Gao, Jianjun ; Huang, Xuemei ; Park, Yikyung ; Hollenbeck, Albert ; Blair, Aaron ; Schatzkin, Arthur ; Chen, Honglei. / Daytime napping, nighttime sleeping, and parkinson disease. In: American journal of epidemiology. 2011 ; Vol. 173, No. 9. pp. 1032-1038.
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Gao, J, Huang, X, Park, Y, Hollenbeck, A, Blair, A, Schatzkin, A & Chen, H 2011, 'Daytime napping, nighttime sleeping, and parkinson disease', American journal of epidemiology, vol. 173, no. 9, pp. 1032-1038. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwq478

Daytime napping, nighttime sleeping, and parkinson disease. / Gao, Jianjun; Huang, Xuemei; Park, Yikyung; Hollenbeck, Albert; Blair, Aaron; Schatzkin, Arthur; Chen, Honglei.

In: American journal of epidemiology, Vol. 173, No. 9, 01.05.2011, p. 1032-1038.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Gao J, Huang X, Park Y, Hollenbeck A, Blair A, Schatzkin A et al. Daytime napping, nighttime sleeping, and parkinson disease. American journal of epidemiology. 2011 May 1;173(9):1032-1038. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwq478