Decreased radiation exposure among orthopedic residents is maintained when using the mini C-arm after undergoing radiation safety training

David Gendelberg, William Hennrikus, Carissa Sawyer, Douglas Armstrong, Steven King

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The resident curriculum of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery emphasizes radiation safety. Gendelberg showed that, immediately after a program on fluoroscopic safety, residents used less radiation when using the mini C-arm to reduce pediatric fractures. The current study evaluated whether this effect lasted. Residents underwent a new annual 3-hour session on mini C-arm use and radiation. Group A included 53 reductions performed before training. Group B included 45 reductions performed immediately after training. Group C included 46 reductions performed 11 months later. For distal radius fractures, exposure time and amount were 38.1 seconds and 83.1 mR, respectively, for group A; 26.7 seconds and 32.6 mR, respectively, for group B; and 24.1 seconds and 40.0 mR, respectively, for group C. When radiation time and amount were compared between group B and group C, P values were .525 and .293, respectively. When group C and group A were compared, P values were <.05 and <.01, respectively. For both bone forearm fractures, exposure time and amount were 41.2 seconds and 90.9 mR, respectively, for group A; 28.9 seconds and 30.4 mR, respectively, for group B; and 31.2 seconds and 43.6 mR, respectively, for group C. When radiation time and amount were compared between group B and group C, P values were .704 and .117, respectively. When group C and group A were compared, P values were .183 and .004, respectively. No significant difference in radiation exposure was noted immediately after training vs 11 months later. A sustained decrease in radiation exposure occurred after an educational program on safe mini C-arm use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e788-e792
JournalOrthopedics
Volume40
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

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Orthopedics
Arm
Radiation
Safety
Radius Fractures
Bone Fractures
Forearm
Curriculum
Radiation Exposure
Pediatrics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Decreased radiation exposure among orthopedic residents is maintained when using the mini C-arm after undergoing radiation safety training",
abstract = "The resident curriculum of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery emphasizes radiation safety. Gendelberg showed that, immediately after a program on fluoroscopic safety, residents used less radiation when using the mini C-arm to reduce pediatric fractures. The current study evaluated whether this effect lasted. Residents underwent a new annual 3-hour session on mini C-arm use and radiation. Group A included 53 reductions performed before training. Group B included 45 reductions performed immediately after training. Group C included 46 reductions performed 11 months later. For distal radius fractures, exposure time and amount were 38.1 seconds and 83.1 mR, respectively, for group A; 26.7 seconds and 32.6 mR, respectively, for group B; and 24.1 seconds and 40.0 mR, respectively, for group C. When radiation time and amount were compared between group B and group C, P values were .525 and .293, respectively. When group C and group A were compared, P values were <.05 and <.01, respectively. For both bone forearm fractures, exposure time and amount were 41.2 seconds and 90.9 mR, respectively, for group A; 28.9 seconds and 30.4 mR, respectively, for group B; and 31.2 seconds and 43.6 mR, respectively, for group C. When radiation time and amount were compared between group B and group C, P values were .704 and .117, respectively. When group C and group A were compared, P values were .183 and .004, respectively. No significant difference in radiation exposure was noted immediately after training vs 11 months later. A sustained decrease in radiation exposure occurred after an educational program on safe mini C-arm use.",
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Decreased radiation exposure among orthopedic residents is maintained when using the mini C-arm after undergoing radiation safety training. / Gendelberg, David; Hennrikus, William; Sawyer, Carissa; Armstrong, Douglas; King, Steven.

In: Orthopedics, Vol. 40, No. 5, 01.09.2017, p. e788-e792.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Decreased radiation exposure among orthopedic residents is maintained when using the mini C-arm after undergoing radiation safety training

AU - Gendelberg, David

AU - Hennrikus, William

AU - Sawyer, Carissa

AU - Armstrong, Douglas

AU - King, Steven

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N2 - The resident curriculum of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery emphasizes radiation safety. Gendelberg showed that, immediately after a program on fluoroscopic safety, residents used less radiation when using the mini C-arm to reduce pediatric fractures. The current study evaluated whether this effect lasted. Residents underwent a new annual 3-hour session on mini C-arm use and radiation. Group A included 53 reductions performed before training. Group B included 45 reductions performed immediately after training. Group C included 46 reductions performed 11 months later. For distal radius fractures, exposure time and amount were 38.1 seconds and 83.1 mR, respectively, for group A; 26.7 seconds and 32.6 mR, respectively, for group B; and 24.1 seconds and 40.0 mR, respectively, for group C. When radiation time and amount were compared between group B and group C, P values were .525 and .293, respectively. When group C and group A were compared, P values were <.05 and <.01, respectively. For both bone forearm fractures, exposure time and amount were 41.2 seconds and 90.9 mR, respectively, for group A; 28.9 seconds and 30.4 mR, respectively, for group B; and 31.2 seconds and 43.6 mR, respectively, for group C. When radiation time and amount were compared between group B and group C, P values were .704 and .117, respectively. When group C and group A were compared, P values were .183 and .004, respectively. No significant difference in radiation exposure was noted immediately after training vs 11 months later. A sustained decrease in radiation exposure occurred after an educational program on safe mini C-arm use.

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