Defect-mediated polarization switching in ferroelectrics and related materials: From mesoscopic mechanisms to atomistic control

Sergei V. Kalinin, Brian J. Rodriguez, Albina Y. Borisevich, Arthur P. Baddorf, Nina Balke, Hye Jung Chang, Long-qing Chen, Samrat Choudhury, Stephen Jesse, Peter Maksymovych, Maxim P. Nikiforov, Stephen J. Pennycook

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

The plethora of lattice and electronic behaviors in ferroelectric and multiferroic materials and heterostructures opens vistas into novel physical phenomena including magnetoelectric coupling and ferroelectric tunneling. The development of new classes of electronic, energy-storage, and information-technology devices depends critically on understanding and controlling field-induced polarization switching. Polarization reversal is controlled by defects that determine activation energy, critical switching bias, and the selection between thermodynamically equivalent polarization states in multiaxial ferroelectrics. Understanding and controlling defect functionality in ferroelectric materials is as critical to the future of oxide electronics and solid-state electrochemistry as defects in semiconductors are for semiconductor electronics. Here, recent advances in understanding the defectmediated switching mechanisms, enabled by recent advances in electron and scanning probe microscopy, are discussed. The synergy between local probes and structural methods offers a pathway to decipher deterministic polarization switching mechanisms on the level of a single atomically defined defect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)314-322
Number of pages9
JournalAdvanced Materials
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 19 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

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