Defective motion processing in children with cerebral visual impairment due to periventricular white matter damage

Joel M. Weinstein, Rick Owen Gilmore, Sumera M. Shaikh, Allen Kunselman, William Trescher, Lauren M. Tashima, Marianne Boltz, Matthew B. McAuliffe, Albert Cheung, Jeremy D. Fesi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim We sought to characterize visual motion processing in children with cerebral visual impairment (CVI) due to periventricular white matter damage caused by either hydrocephalus (eight individuals) or periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) associated with prematurity (11 individuals). Method Using steady-state visually evoked potentials (ssVEP), we measured cortical activity related to motion processing for two distinct types of visual stimuli: 'local' motion patterns thought to activate mainly primary visual cortex (V1), and 'global' or coherent patterns thought to activate higher cortical visual association areas (V3, V5, etc.). We studied three groups of children: (1) 19 children with CVI (mean age 9y 6mo [SD 3y 8mo]; 9 male; 10 female); (2) 40 neurologically and visually normal comparison children (mean age 9y 6mo [SD 3y 1mo]; 18 male; 22 female); and (3) because strabismus and amblyopia are common in children with CVI, a group of 41 children without neurological problems who had visual deficits due to amblyopia and/or strabismus (mean age 7y 8mo [SD 2y 8mo]; 28 male; 13 female). Results We found that the processing of global as opposed to local motion was preferentially impaired in individuals with CVI, especially for slower target velocities (p=0.028). Interpretation Motion processing is impaired in children with CVI. ssVEP may provide useful and objective information about the development of higher visual function in children at risk for CVI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Volume54
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2012

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Vision Disorders
Amblyopia
Strabismus
Evoked Potentials
Periventricular Leukomalacia
White Matter
Visual Cortex
Hydrocephalus

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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title = "Defective motion processing in children with cerebral visual impairment due to periventricular white matter damage",
abstract = "Aim We sought to characterize visual motion processing in children with cerebral visual impairment (CVI) due to periventricular white matter damage caused by either hydrocephalus (eight individuals) or periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) associated with prematurity (11 individuals). Method Using steady-state visually evoked potentials (ssVEP), we measured cortical activity related to motion processing for two distinct types of visual stimuli: 'local' motion patterns thought to activate mainly primary visual cortex (V1), and 'global' or coherent patterns thought to activate higher cortical visual association areas (V3, V5, etc.). We studied three groups of children: (1) 19 children with CVI (mean age 9y 6mo [SD 3y 8mo]; 9 male; 10 female); (2) 40 neurologically and visually normal comparison children (mean age 9y 6mo [SD 3y 1mo]; 18 male; 22 female); and (3) because strabismus and amblyopia are common in children with CVI, a group of 41 children without neurological problems who had visual deficits due to amblyopia and/or strabismus (mean age 7y 8mo [SD 2y 8mo]; 28 male; 13 female). Results We found that the processing of global as opposed to local motion was preferentially impaired in individuals with CVI, especially for slower target velocities (p=0.028). Interpretation Motion processing is impaired in children with CVI. ssVEP may provide useful and objective information about the development of higher visual function in children at risk for CVI.",
author = "Weinstein, {Joel M.} and Gilmore, {Rick Owen} and Shaikh, {Sumera M.} and Allen Kunselman and William Trescher and Tashima, {Lauren M.} and Marianne Boltz and McAuliffe, {Matthew B.} and Albert Cheung and Fesi, {Jeremy D.}",
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Defective motion processing in children with cerebral visual impairment due to periventricular white matter damage. / Weinstein, Joel M.; Gilmore, Rick Owen; Shaikh, Sumera M.; Kunselman, Allen; Trescher, William; Tashima, Lauren M.; Boltz, Marianne; McAuliffe, Matthew B.; Cheung, Albert; Fesi, Jeremy D.

In: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, Vol. 54, No. 7, 01.07.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Defective motion processing in children with cerebral visual impairment due to periventricular white matter damage

AU - Weinstein, Joel M.

AU - Gilmore, Rick Owen

AU - Shaikh, Sumera M.

AU - Kunselman, Allen

AU - Trescher, William

AU - Tashima, Lauren M.

AU - Boltz, Marianne

AU - McAuliffe, Matthew B.

AU - Cheung, Albert

AU - Fesi, Jeremy D.

PY - 2012/7/1

Y1 - 2012/7/1

N2 - Aim We sought to characterize visual motion processing in children with cerebral visual impairment (CVI) due to periventricular white matter damage caused by either hydrocephalus (eight individuals) or periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) associated with prematurity (11 individuals). Method Using steady-state visually evoked potentials (ssVEP), we measured cortical activity related to motion processing for two distinct types of visual stimuli: 'local' motion patterns thought to activate mainly primary visual cortex (V1), and 'global' or coherent patterns thought to activate higher cortical visual association areas (V3, V5, etc.). We studied three groups of children: (1) 19 children with CVI (mean age 9y 6mo [SD 3y 8mo]; 9 male; 10 female); (2) 40 neurologically and visually normal comparison children (mean age 9y 6mo [SD 3y 1mo]; 18 male; 22 female); and (3) because strabismus and amblyopia are common in children with CVI, a group of 41 children without neurological problems who had visual deficits due to amblyopia and/or strabismus (mean age 7y 8mo [SD 2y 8mo]; 28 male; 13 female). Results We found that the processing of global as opposed to local motion was preferentially impaired in individuals with CVI, especially for slower target velocities (p=0.028). Interpretation Motion processing is impaired in children with CVI. ssVEP may provide useful and objective information about the development of higher visual function in children at risk for CVI.

AB - Aim We sought to characterize visual motion processing in children with cerebral visual impairment (CVI) due to periventricular white matter damage caused by either hydrocephalus (eight individuals) or periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) associated with prematurity (11 individuals). Method Using steady-state visually evoked potentials (ssVEP), we measured cortical activity related to motion processing for two distinct types of visual stimuli: 'local' motion patterns thought to activate mainly primary visual cortex (V1), and 'global' or coherent patterns thought to activate higher cortical visual association areas (V3, V5, etc.). We studied three groups of children: (1) 19 children with CVI (mean age 9y 6mo [SD 3y 8mo]; 9 male; 10 female); (2) 40 neurologically and visually normal comparison children (mean age 9y 6mo [SD 3y 1mo]; 18 male; 22 female); and (3) because strabismus and amblyopia are common in children with CVI, a group of 41 children without neurological problems who had visual deficits due to amblyopia and/or strabismus (mean age 7y 8mo [SD 2y 8mo]; 28 male; 13 female). Results We found that the processing of global as opposed to local motion was preferentially impaired in individuals with CVI, especially for slower target velocities (p=0.028). Interpretation Motion processing is impaired in children with CVI. ssVEP may provide useful and objective information about the development of higher visual function in children at risk for CVI.

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