Democratic skepticism and support for terrorism in the Palestinian Territories

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research has found that, among other factors, skepticism about democracy and its suitability as a form of government helps to drive public support for violent extremism in the Muslim World. According to scholars, Muslim skeptics of democracy resent it as the product of Western political and cultural intrusion and reflexively support violent extremism as an expression of cultural resistance. Using public opinion data on support for various forms of terrorism among survey respondents in the Palestinian Territories, I find evidence for a more complex explanation. Respondents that support terrorism are indeed more likely to be skeptical of democracy because they regard it to be incompatible with Islam. However, terrorism supporters also reject democratic rule because they associate it with poor economic performance. The results suggest that democratic skepticism is associated with support for terrorism in Muslim societies, but point to both religious-cultural and socioeconomic factors as important components of the relationship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPublic Choice
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Palestinian territories
terrorism
Muslim
radicalism
democracy
socioeconomic factors
public support
cultural factors
Islam
public opinion
Palestinians
Terrorism
Skepticism
society
performance
evidence
economics
Democracy
Muslims
Extremism

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

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abstract = "Research has found that, among other factors, skepticism about democracy and its suitability as a form of government helps to drive public support for violent extremism in the Muslim World. According to scholars, Muslim skeptics of democracy resent it as the product of Western political and cultural intrusion and reflexively support violent extremism as an expression of cultural resistance. Using public opinion data on support for various forms of terrorism among survey respondents in the Palestinian Territories, I find evidence for a more complex explanation. Respondents that support terrorism are indeed more likely to be skeptical of democracy because they regard it to be incompatible with Islam. However, terrorism supporters also reject democratic rule because they associate it with poor economic performance. The results suggest that democratic skepticism is associated with support for terrorism in Muslim societies, but point to both religious-cultural and socioeconomic factors as important components of the relationship.",
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Democratic skepticism and support for terrorism in the Palestinian Territories. / Piazza, James A.

In: Public Choice, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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