Demographic, intrinsic, and extrinsic factors associated with weapon carrying at school

Cheryl M. Kodjo, Peggy Auinger, Sheryl A. Ryan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Recent incidents of school violence have heightened the need to identify societal, interpersonal, and adolescent characteristics that contribute to weapon carrying. Objectives: To assess the prevalence of weapon carrying at school and to determine associated risk factors for adolescent males and females. Design: A cross-sectional study using the 1994-1995 National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health data. Participants: A nationally representative sample of 6504 adolescents and their parents. Main Outcome Measure: Whether adolescents have ever carried a weapon at school. Statistics: X 2 Analyses and hierarchical regressions were done using SPSS (SPSS Inc, Chicago, III) and SUDAAN (Research Triangle Park, NC) software. Regression models included demographic, intrinsic, and extrinsic factors. Results: Of the overall sample, 9.3% (n=595) reported having carried a weapon at school. Of these, 77% were male (male vs female adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 3.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3-4.1). Substance use, school problems, perpetration of violence, and witnessing violence were significantly associated with weapon carrying for both males and females. However, for males, extrinsic factors were more important in mediating the effects of substance use and perpetration of physical violence on school weapon carrying, while intrinsic factors mediate these variables for females. Conclusion: These findings suggest that interventions for violence prevention for males and females need to be targeted toward different areas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)96-103
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Volume157
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

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Intrinsic Factor
Weapons
Demography
Violence
National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health
Software
Cross-Sectional Studies
Parents
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Confidence Intervals
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

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abstract = "Background: Recent incidents of school violence have heightened the need to identify societal, interpersonal, and adolescent characteristics that contribute to weapon carrying. Objectives: To assess the prevalence of weapon carrying at school and to determine associated risk factors for adolescent males and females. Design: A cross-sectional study using the 1994-1995 National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health data. Participants: A nationally representative sample of 6504 adolescents and their parents. Main Outcome Measure: Whether adolescents have ever carried a weapon at school. Statistics: X 2 Analyses and hierarchical regressions were done using SPSS (SPSS Inc, Chicago, III) and SUDAAN (Research Triangle Park, NC) software. Regression models included demographic, intrinsic, and extrinsic factors. Results: Of the overall sample, 9.3{\%} (n=595) reported having carried a weapon at school. Of these, 77{\%} were male (male vs female adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 3.1; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 2.3-4.1). Substance use, school problems, perpetration of violence, and witnessing violence were significantly associated with weapon carrying for both males and females. However, for males, extrinsic factors were more important in mediating the effects of substance use and perpetration of physical violence on school weapon carrying, while intrinsic factors mediate these variables for females. Conclusion: These findings suggest that interventions for violence prevention for males and females need to be targeted toward different areas.",
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Demographic, intrinsic, and extrinsic factors associated with weapon carrying at school. / Kodjo, Cheryl M.; Auinger, Peggy; Ryan, Sheryl A.

In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Vol. 157, No. 1, 01.01.2003, p. 96-103.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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